AnsweredAssumed Answered

vrf A tough one...

Question asked by VRFuser on Sep 25, 2006
After reading all the other responses, I can suggest a few possibilities.
 
One:  If the equipment is subject to FCC regulation you may find the progocols buried in some government regulations.
 
Two:  If you know the SNMP that goes in and can control the results that way, figuring out the mapping between the SMNP and a serial stream should not be that hard.  It sounds as if you are starting out totally blind.
 
Three:  Scrap them and start over with known equipment from cooperative vendors.  That is probably cheaper too, since time is money.
 
Robert Reavis
Warm Springs Computer Works
Fremont, California
 
 

----- Original Message -----
From: HYPERLINK "mailto:dbrudrow@sbcglobal.net"Doug Rudrow
To: HYPERLINK "mailto:vrf@agilent.com"VRF
Sent: Monday, September 25, 2006 1:28 AM
Subject: [vrf] A tough one...


Greetings vrf,

 

Let me begin by thanking this forum in general and many of you personally for all of your help over the years and especially in the last few months as I’ve begun a new professional adventure. You’ve made the transition into my new position much smoother and made me look good in the process.

 

Now I find myself begging for help once again. This one may be too much to ask for. I have a piece of equipment, well, to be honest, I’ve got 13 of them, which I need to control. The problem is: This equipment was not designed to be used as test equipment. It is meant to be used by cable providers in their head-end systems. As such, it is designed to be monitored and controlled by a network monitoring system, sold by the manufacturer at an incredibly high price. What this monitoring system does is translate SNMP into a proprietary serial protocol that communicates with these upconverters. We’ve tried to no avail to get the manufacturer to give (or even sell) us the right to use the protocol to control these upconverters for use in a test system. The big question is: is there any way to hack into these upconverters in order to discover the details of the protocol that will allow us to set the frequency and power level? We don’t have the first clue about this protocol, whether it is packet based, what the baud rate is, what the byte size is, whether there are start or stop bits or if there is per byte parity. Are we pretty much hosed or is there a glimmer of hope out there?

 

Thanks,

Doug

 

 

Douglas B. Rudrow

Systems Development Lab Technologist

Aurora Networks

2803 Mission College Blvd.

Santa Clara, California, 95054

U.S.A.

(408) 235-7000 Main

(408) 235 7084 Direct

HYPERLINK "mailto:rvilla@aurora.com"drudrow@aurora.com

dbrudrow@sbcglobal.net

 


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