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Keeping up with Measurement “Fundamentals”

Blog Post created by benz on Oct 20, 2017

  While some are timeless, others evolve

This post will be brief, partly a consequence of the wildfires that have affected the Santa Rosa headquarters of Keysight and modified all our schedules, at least a little. Without getting too metaphysical, the fires and their aftermath are a powerful reminder that things are always changing.

This is certainly true in technology and test equipment. The need for better measurements never abates, and I’d like to say a thing or two about our cooperative efforts to keep pushing forward in applications (yours) and measurements (ours).

I’ve been reminded of the changing nature of measurement fundamentals in the context of my previous post on the innovations of the vector signal analyzer and Keysight’s RF test engineering webcast series on measurement fundamentals.

While some things are timeless—such as resolution bandwidth and power addition—others begin as advanced concepts and gradually become mainstream and even fundamental. Examples include ACPR/ACLR and error vector magnitude (EVM). Many of us can remember the first time someone explained channel power integration or vector error quantities to us, and yet eventually these measurement concepts are taken for granted in the context of more complex figures of merit. How about cumulative ACLR for non-contiguous aggregated carriers?

A similar phenomenon is evident in the core signal analyzer architecture described in the previous post. Vector signal analyzers began as a new type of analyzer, with a different architecture to preserve calibrated vector signal information. Eventually, this advanced architecture became common in lab-grade signal analyzers, and vector signal analysis transitioned to be an embedded software application for the analyzer platform.

The old/new duality is evident in the RF test webcast series mentioned above. The next installment deals with fundamentals.

Portion of Web page describing signal analysis fundamentals webcast, to be presented by Dave Engelder

Dave Engelder’s webcast will cover fundamentals, informed by his considerable involvement in new-generation analyzer architectures.

It’s a little ironic that Dave, the presenter for the fundamentals webcast, has spent a great deal of his time in recent years on product definition and planning for the newest generation of signal analyzers and their advanced capabilities.

Some fundamentals are timeless and unchanging, and others eventually give way to superior techniques and technologies. I suspect that dealing with an evolving mix of the timeless and the temporary is our fate as long as we work in RF.

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