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Measuring ACPR: Adding Voltage or Adding Power?

Blog Post created by benz on Jun 20, 2017

  Coherence can make a big difference

Sometimes The Fates of Measurement smile upon you, and sometimes they conspire against you. In many cases, however, it’s hard to tell which—if either—is happening.

More often, I think, they set little traps or tests for us. These are often subtle, but nonetheless important, especially when you’re trying to make the best measurements possible, close to the limits of your test equipment.

In this post I’m focusing on coherence as a factor in ACPR/ACLR measurements. These ratios are a fundamental measurement for RF engineering, quantifying the ability of transmitters to properly share the RF spectrum.

To make the best measurements, it’s essential to understand the analyzer’s contribution to ACP and keep it to a minimum. As we’ve discussed previously, the analyzer itself will contribute power to measurements, and this can be a significant addition when measuring anywhere near its noise or distortion floor.

We might expect this straightforward power contribution to also apply to ACPR measurements, where the signals appear to be a kind of band-limited noise that may slope with frequency. However, it’s important to remember that these are actually distortion measurements, and that the assumption of non-coherence between the signal and the analyzer is no longer a given.

Indeed, an intuitive look at the nonlinearity mechanisms in transmitters and analyzers suggests that coherence of some kind is to be expected. This moves us from power addition (a range of 0 dB to +3dB) to voltage addition and the larger apparent power differences this can cause.

Diagram of error in ACPR/ACLR measurements vs. analyzer mixer level/attenuation. Diagram specifically calls out the case where DUT and analyzer ACPR are same, and how this can cause large ACPR errors due to coherent signal addition or cancellation.

This diagram shows how analyzer mixer level affects ACPR measurement error when the analyzer and DUT distortion are coherent. The largest errors occur when the ACP of the DUT and analyzer are the same, indicated by the vertical dashed red line.

Interestingly, the widest potential error band occurs not where the analyzer ACP is largest but when it is the same as the DUT ACP. Consequently, adjusting the mixer level to minimize total measured ACP may lead you to a false minimum.

There are a number of challenges in optimizing an ACPR measurement:

  •  Noise power subtraction cannot be used due to analyzer/DUT coherence.
  •  Narrow RBWs are no help because they have an equal effect on the apparent power from the analyzer and DUT.
  • Low mixer levels (or higher input attenuation) minimize analyzer-generated distortion but increase measurement noise floor.
  • High mixer levels improve measurement noise floor but increase analyzer-generated distortion.

While the settings for lowest total measurement error are not exactly the same as for minimum analyzer-generated ACP, they are generally very close. In a future post I’ll discuss the differences, and ways to optimize accuracy, no matter what The Fates have in mind for you.

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