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2017

If you are working on embedded designs such as automotive controllers, sensors, actuators, avionics, weapons systems, transmitting uncompressed audio and video data, or other chip-to-chip communications, you are probably using protocols and need a way to decode serial buses.

Protocol decode is the process of translating an electrical signal from a serial bus into meaningful bit sequences as defined by the standards of the protocol being analyzed. As we use serial buses in our designs to communicate from one device to another, we often need to debug our designs and verify we are sending the messages, or bit packets, that we intend to send.

One way to do this is to manually decode the signal. To do this, first you must capture the signal on an oscilloscope. Next, break apart the signal into one bit time slices and count the stream of ones and zeroes. Then group the sequence of bits and decode by the specifications of the protocol you are using. An example of this process is shown in the image below. This example is of a CAN bus.

Figure 1 - Decoding a CAN bus by hand

While this exercise might make an interesting learning experience for engineering students, this is a tedious and obsolete way to decode. Now days, you can decode your serial buses using a protocol analyzer or protocol decode software on your oscilloscope. This oscilloscope software will count the bits and compartmentalize the data into meaningful packets based on the definitions of the protocol you are using. With many oscilloscopes, you can even view the protocol decode results in a lister window.

 

Keysight InfiniiVision and Infiniium oscilloscopes display the original waveform, a time aligned decode trace for the data captured on screen, and a lister which is a text based table. The lister displays all the data packets, the time at which they occurred, the type of packet, and other relevant packet information specific to the protocol in use. Additionally, the lister will include the error type if an error was detected. Below is an example of CAN protocol decode performed on an InfiniiVision oscilloscope:

Figure 2 - CAN Protocol Decode performed by InfiniiVision oscilloscope

To find errors by hand you’d have to cross reference the packets you decoded with the packets you were trying to send at that point in the sequence and check if you have errors. Plus, you would be limited to the part of the waveform you could view on screen. As you can imagine, this is tedious. However, protocol decode software can find errors for you. Plus, with Keysight oscilloscopes, you can even trigger on errors or a specified packet type so you can easily find and analyze the events that interest you.

If you are looking for an entry level, affordable oscilloscope, the Keysight InfiniiVision 1000X-Series oscilloscopes have the ability to perform protocol hardware trigger and decode of I2C, SPI, UART/RS-232, CAN, and LIN buses.

1000 X-Series Oscilloscope

Figure 3 - Keysight 1000X-Series oscilloscope

If you are looking for an oscilloscope with higher bandwidth and additional capabilities, the Infiniium oscilloscopes offer several more protocol decode options including 8B/10B, ARINC 429, MIL-STD-1553, CAN, CAN-FD, LIN, FlexRay, DVI, HDMI, I2C, SPI, RS-232/UART, JTAG, several MIPI protocols, PCI Express, SATA/SAS, SVID, USB2.0, USB 3.0, USB 3.1, USB PD, and eSPI.

This variety of protocol decode addresses several industries. For example, the automotive industry often use CAN (Controller Area Network), CAN-FD (Controller Area Network – Flexible Data-rate), LIN (Local Interconnect Network), and FlexRay. These are the main buses used for automotive controllers, sensors, and actuators used throughout our vehicles. Designers in this space will want to be able to debug the physical layer of their designs. And because it is so important to have reliable systems in our automobiles, it is important to have reliable decode software.

Other buses that are important to have properly tested and reliable designs are ARINC 429 and MIL-STD-1553. These are often used in military equipment such as avionics, weapons systems, or ground vehicles.

As USB (Universal Serial Bus) has become so popular and continues to advance quickly, it is important to have the ability to decode both legacy USB protocols such as USB 2.0 and the newer USB protocols such as USB 3.1, and USB Power Delivery.   USB is everywhere now with its use in smartphones, computer peripheral devices, cameras, power chargers for hand held devices, and drones.

High definition televisions and displays usually use HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface) protocol for transmitting uncompressed audio and video data. DVI (Digital Visual Interface) is also used to transmit digital video.

Buses used for Short distances with integrated circuits include I2C and SPI.

Serial buses are used everywhere. With the ability to set up the decode in less than 30 seconds, set up specialized triggers and search on specific packet types or errors, and expand the amount of useful data captured with segmented memory, oscilloscopes make decoding serial buses much more efficient than decoding by hand. Protocol decode software on oscilloscopes help you quickly move from decoding to analysis and debugging.

Professor BodeWhen I was an electrical engineering student back in the 1970’s at the University of South Florida — go bulls! — two of my favorite classes were Control Systems and Analog Circuit Fundamentals. One reason I loved these classes so much was because we got to create Bode plots. I know, that sounds weird. I really enjoyed finding the theoretical poles and zeros and drawing Bode plots on my green engineering graph paper by hand (pencil, paper, and a ruler). Thank you Professor Bode; you are my hero! But when it came time to go into the lab to verify the frequency response of something like a passive or active filter design that we were assigned to build and test, there were no frequency response analyzers (sometimes called network analyzers) to be found.

 

In those days network analyzers were highly specialized and expensive multi-box systems from test and measurement vendors, including Hewlett-Packard (Keysight’s predecessor). Without

access to one of these expensive instruments in my EE lab, the testing process consisted of taking multiple VIN, VOUT, and Δt measurements on an oscilloscope while changing the input sine wave frequency on a function generator. After making 15 or 20 measurements, I would have enough measured data points to convert to gain (20LogVOUT/VIN) and phase shift (Δt/T x 360) using my trusty slide rule. I would then plot the results back onto that green engineering graph paper alongside the theoretical plots for comparison.

 

The days of plotting theoretical results by hand are over. Most engineering students today use MATLAB® to do that. And certainly the days of taking multiple VIN and VOUT measurements in the lab using an oscilloscope and a function generator set at discreet frequencies must be over, right? After all, the test and measurement industry now offers a broad range of frequency response analyzers (FRA) and vector network analyzers (VNA) that create gain and phase plots automagically. But those days aren’t over! Most undergraduate EE teaching labs are not equipped with frequency response analyzers. Almost all EE students today use the same tedious method of testing a circuit’s frequency response that I used back in ancient times. Why is that?

 

FRAs and VNAs are still considered by many to be a specialized instrument — especially in the university environment. In addition, the price of these instruments start at around US $5,000 and go up from there. This may not sound like much for someone in the high tech industry that depends on this type of instrument to get to their testing done quickly, but almost all universities have to operate on a tight budget. A typical student lab bench (consisting of an entry-level 2-channel oscilloscope, function generator, digital voltmeter (DVM), and power supply) can be purchased for about US $2,000 today. To equip an entire student teaching lab with an FRA at an additional US $5,000 per test station would blow most EE lab budgets out of the water.


 1000 X-Series Oscilloscope

But now the process of making multiple VIN and VOUT oscilloscope measurements to create Bode gain and phase plots are about to be over for many EE students – at least for students at universities that equip their labs with a new Keysight oscilloscope. Keysight just introduced a family of low-cost oscilloscopes with an optional built-in function generator (Figure 2). And the best part is that automatic frequency response analysis (Bode gain and phase plots) can be performed on these student oscilloscopes at no additional charge on models that come equipped with the built-in WaveGen function generator and frequency response analysis (EDUX1002G and DSOX1102G). All of this functionality (oscilloscope, function generator, and frequency response analysis) can be had for just over US $600. Let’s take a look at a measurement example of characterizing a passive bandpass filter using this new oscilloscope.

Passive RLC bandpass filter

Figure 3 shows the schematic of a simple RLC circuit that we will test. At lower frequencies, the 1-µF capacitor dominates the impedance (XC = 1/2πfC) of this circuit and blocks most of VIN from getting to VOUT. At higher frequencies, the 10-µH inductor (XL = 2πfL) blocks most of the input from getting to the output. But in the mid-band frequencies, the 50-Ω load resistor dominates such that most of VIN reaches VOUT (~0 dB). By definition, this is a bandpass filter. We will now test it with Keysight’s new oscilloscope with the built-in function generator and frequency response analysis capability.

 

We begin by connecting the output of the generator to VIN and also probe VIN and VOUT with channel 1 and channel 2 of the oscilloscope, respectively. Figure 4 shows the frequency response analysis setup menu, which displays a block diagram to assist us in making proper connections. This is also where we can define which of the oscilloscope’s input channels is probing VIN, which channel is probing VOUT, the minimum test frequency, maximum test frequency, and test amplitude. For this test, we will use all the default settings. When we select Run Analysis, the oscilloscope executes the one-time  test, sometimes called a "sweep."

Figure 5 shows the test results. The blue trace represents gain (in dB) with scale factors shown on the left side of the display, while the orange trace represents phase (in degrees) with scale factors shown on the right side of the display. A pair of markers is also available to measure gain and phase at any frequency. The oscilloscope even optimizes magnitude and phase scaling factors automatically. But you also have the ability to establish your own scale factors manually after completion of the test. This is probably the easiest-to-use frequency response analyzer on the market today. At least that’s my opinion. And it has to be the least-expensive FRA because it comes standard (US $0) with the purchase of an EDUX1002G or DSOX1102G oscilloscope, which is only US $200 more than the baseline 1000 X-Series model (US $449). But performance is not sacrificed. Using a proprietary measurement algorithm, this instrument can achieve up to 80 dB of dynamic range based on a 0 dBm (224 mVrms) input.

 

Using this new Keysight oscilloscope capability has sure saved me a lot of time in my job. And I bet it will save EE students a lot of time as well so they can complete their lab assignments on time!

 

 

MATLAB is a registered trademark of MathWork, Inc.

The second the probe is connected to your device your signal begins a grand journey to the center of the scope. It has to pass through five phases in order to complete its journey to the center, then back up to the surface. First the signal has to find its way to the front of the scope through the probe. Then, once it enters the scope, it has to go through an attenuator, DC offset, and amplifier before it can reach the center. At the center, the signal goes through an analog to digital converter. In order to make its way back to the surface of the scope, it must venture to find the display DSP. Along the way, it finds evidence that signals have been here before. The timebase and acquisition blocks show that previous samples of signals have been collected. Once the signal passes through these two blocks, it will finally be displayed on the surface of the scope. Let’s learn a little bit more about everything your signal encounters along this journey.

Oscilloscope Signal

 

Your signal’s journey begins with traveling from your device through a series of resistive and capacitive components inside the probe. The attenuation specification of your probe will determine what resistive components are inside. Most standard passive voltage probes that come with DSO scopes have a 10:1 attenuation ratio. This type of probe would have a 9 MΩ probe tip resistor in series with the scope’s 1 MΩ input impedance. This would make the resistance at the probe tip 10 MΩ, which means that when your signal travels through the probe and reaches the scope’s input, it will be 1/10th of the voltage level that it was when it entered the probe at the tip from your device. This means that the dynamic range of the scope measurement system has been extended because you can now measure signals with 10x higher amplitude as compared to signals you could measure using a 1:1 probe. Also, this 10:1 passive probe ensures a high input impedance at the probe tip which will eliminate any loading on your device. Loading will change the way your device behaves, and we don’t want that.

Analog Input Signal Conditioning

 

Next the signal enters the scope to begin the first phase of processing, analog input signal conditioning. There are three stages to this conditioning process which are all done in order to scale the waveform correctly to be within the dynamic range of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and the amplifier. The processing done in these stages is dependent on what the V/div and offset settings are, which ultimately depends on whether you are measuring a low level or high level signal. First, the signal is scaled in the attenuator block, which is a network of resistor dividers. If you have a high level input signal, then the signal will be attenuated, or reduced. If you are inputting a low-level signal, then the signal will be passed through to the next step without any attenuation. You may often be inputting a signal that has a DC offset, but we want to be able to display that signal in the center of the screen at 0 V. In order to make that happen, there is an internal DC offset of the opposite polarity that is added to the signal to shift the scale. This way it will display on the center of the screen. Lastly, the signal travels into the variable gain amplifier. This type of amplifier will either increase or decrease the gain of your signal dependent on what your V/div setting. So, this again depends on whether you are looking at a low or high level signal. If you are working with a low level signal, you are likely at a low V/div setting which would tell the amplifier the gain should be increased so that we are utilizing the full range of the ADC. If you are working with a high level signal, then the signal would have been attenuated back in the first stage of this process, and the amplifier may then further attenuate the signal in this stage by decreasing the gain, again to scale the signal within the dynamic range of the ADC.

Analog to Digital Conversion and Trigger Blocks

 

Now that the signal is conditioned to be within the dynamic range of the ADC, it can enter the center of the scope and the analog to digital conversion can begin. The ADC block is the core component of all DSOs. This is where the analog input signal gets converted into a series of digital words. Most of today’s DSOs utilize 8-bit ADCs which will provide 256 unique digital output levels/codes. These digital binary codes are stored in the scope’s acquisition memory, which will be discussed later. In order to obtain the highest resolution and accurate measurements, the scope will try to use the full dynamic range of the ADC. While the signal is being converted in the ADC, the scope is also processing the trigger conditions needed to establish a unique point in time on the input signal upon which to establish a synchronized acquisition. Depending on what you set the trigger acquisition settings to on the scope, the trigger comparator block will output a non-inverted waveform with a duty cycle that is dependent on what you set the trigger level to. Then, depending on what you set the trigger type to (rising edge, falling edge, etc.) the trigger logic block will either invert the waveform before allowing it to pass through, or it will allow the non-inverted waveform to be passed through to the next step. This trigger signal is then used in the timebase block in the next step as the unique synchronization point in time.

Timebase and Acquisition Memory Blocks

 

              The timebase block controls when ADC sampling is started and stopped relative to the trigger event that was just determined in the previous step. In addition, the timebase block controls the ADCs sample rate based on the scope’s available acquisition memory depth and the timebase setting. When the Run key is pressed, the timebase block enables continuous storing of the digitized data into the scope’s “circular” acquisition memory at the appropriate sample rate. While the timebase block increments addressing of the circular acquisition memory buffer after each sample, it also counts the number of samples taken up to a certain number which is dependent on the memory depth of the scope along with the trigger position. Once the timebase block determines that the minimum required number of samples of your signal have been collected, the timebase block enables triggering and begins to look for the first qualifying point of the output trigger comparator. Once the trigger event is detected, the timebase block then begins collecting the required number of samples. Once all of the samples have been stored, the timebase block disables the sampling and the process is pushed on to the next step.

 Display DSP Block

             

              Your signal has now reached the final stage in its journey. Once the acquisition of all of the samples has been completed, the data in the acquisition memory is “backed out” in a last-in-first-out sequence. The signal is reconstructed from the samples and the data is put into the scope’s pixel display memory and it is ultimately displayed on the screen. Once all of the data has been “backed out” of the acquisition memory, the DSP block signals the timebase block that it can begin another acquisition. This is a technique that is unique to Keysight’s custom ASIC technology. Traditionally, most other DSO oscilloscopes would not include this DSP block, but would instead use the scope’s CPU system. That method greatly decreases the efficiency of the scope and slows down the waveform update rate, so you would lose accuracy in your measurements and miss important glitches. Using the DSP block allows Keysight scopes to always operate at high efficiency and display a waveform that is more true to what is actually coming out of your device.

 DSP block waveform oscilloscope

              You can see the signal goes through quite the lengthy journey before it is displayed on the scope’s screen, but this all happens in the blink of an eye. To learn more about the fundamentals of oscilloscopes, download Keysight’s application note, Evaluating Oscilloscope Fundamentals. 

The second the probe is connected to your device your signal begins a grand journey to the center of the scope. It has to pass through five phases in order to complete its journey to the center, then back up to the surface. First the signal has to find its way to the front of the oscilloscope through the probe. Then, once it enters the scope, it has to go through an attenuator, DC offset, and amplifier before it can reach the center. At the center, the signal goes through an analog to digital converter. In order to make its way back to the surface of the scope, it must venture to find the display DSP. Along the way, it finds evidence that signals have been here before. The timebase and acquisition blocks show that previous samples of signals have been collected. Once the signal passes through these two blocks, it will finally be displayed on the surface of the oscilloscope. Let’s learn a little bit more about everything your signal encounters along this journey to understand how an oscilloscope works.

Oscilloscope Signal

 

Your signal’s journey begins with traveling from your device through a series of resistive and capacitive components inside the oscilloscope probe. The attenuation specification of your probe will determine what resistive components are inside. Most standard passive voltage probes that come with digital storage oscilloscopes (DSOs) have a 10:1 attenuation ratio. This type of probe would have a 9 MΩ probe tip resistor in series with the scope’s 1 MΩ input impedance. This would make the resistance at the probe tip 10 MΩ, which means that when your signal travels through the probe and reaches the scope’s input, it will be 1/10th of the voltage level that it was when it entered the probe at the tip from your device. This means that the dynamic range of the oscilloscope measurement system has been extended because you can now measure signals with 10x higher amplitude as compared to signals you could measure using a 1:1 probe. Also, this 10:1 passive probe ensures a high input impedance at the probe tip which will eliminate any loading on your device. Loading will change the way your device behaves, and we don’t want that.

Analog Input Signal Conditioning

 

Next the signal enters the oscilloscope to begin the first phase of processing, analog input signal conditioning. There are three stages to this conditioning process which are all done in order to scale the waveform correctly to be within the dynamic range of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and the amplifier. The processing done in these stages is dependent on what the V/div and offset settings are, which ultimately depends on whether you are measuring a low level or high level signal. First, the signal is scaled in the attenuator block, which is a network of resistor dividers. If you have a high level input signal, then the signal will be attenuated, or reduced. If you are inputting a low-level signal, then the signal will be passed through to the next step without any attenuation. You may often be inputting a signal that has a DC offset, but you want to be able to display that signal in the center of the screen at 0 V. In order to make that happen, there is an internal DC offset of the opposite polarity that is added to the signal to shift the scale. This way it will display on the center of the screen. Lastly, the signal travels into the variable gain amplifier. This type of amplifier will either increase or decrease the gain of your signal dependent on what your V/div setting. So, this again depends on whether you are looking at a low or high level signal. If you are working with a low level signal, you are likely at a low V/div setting which would tell the amplifier the gain should be increased so that you are utilizing the full range of the ADC. If you are working with a high level signal, then the signal would have been attenuated back in the first stage of this process, and the amplifier may then further attenuate the signal in this stage by decreasing the gain, again to scale the signal within the dynamic range of the ADC.

Analog to Digital Conversion and Trigger Blocks

 

Now that the signal is conditioned to be within the dynamic range of the ADC, it can enter the center of the scope and the analog to digital conversion can begin. The ADC block is the core component of all DSOs. This is where the analog input signal gets converted into a series of digital words. Most of today’s DSOs utilize 8-bit ADCs which will provide 256 unique digital output levels/codes. These digital binary codes are stored in the oscilloscope’s acquisition memory, which will be discussed later. In order to obtain the highest resolution and accurate measurements, the scope will try to use the full dynamic range of the ADC. While the signal is being converted in the ADC, the scope is also processing the trigger conditions needed to establish a unique point in time on the input signal upon which to establish a synchronized acquisition. Depending on what you set the trigger acquisition settings to on the oscilloscope, the trigger comparator block will output a non-inverted waveform with a duty cycle that is dependent on what you set the trigger level to. Then, depending on what you set the trigger type to (rising edge, falling edge, etc.) the trigger logic block will either invert the waveform before allowing it to pass through, or it will allow the non-inverted waveform to be passed through to the next step. This trigger signal is then used in the timebase block in the next step as the unique synchronization point in time.

Timebase and Acquisition Memory Blocks

 

              The timebase block controls when ADC sampling is started and stopped relative to the trigger event that was just determined in the previous step. In addition, the timebase block controls the ADCs sample rate based on the scope’s available acquisition memory depth and the timebase setting. When the Run key is pressed, the timebase block enables continuous storing of the digitized data into the scope’s “circular” acquisition memory at the appropriate sample rate. While the timebase block increments addressing of the circular acquisition memory buffer after each sample, it also counts the number of samples taken up to a certain number which is dependent on the memory depth of the oscilloscope along with the trigger position. Once the timebase block determines that the minimum required number of samples of your signal have been collected, the timebase block enables triggering and begins to look for the first qualifying point of the output trigger comparator. Once the trigger event is detected, the timebase block then begins collecting the required number of samples. Once all of the samples have been stored, the timebase block disables the sampling and the process is pushed on to the next step.

 Display DSP Block

             

              Your signal has now reached the final stage in its journey. Once the acquisition of all of the samples has been completed, the data in the acquisition memory is “backed out” in a last-in-first-out sequence. The signal is reconstructed from the samples and the data is put into the oscilloscope’s pixel display memory and it is ultimately displayed on the screen. Once all of the data has been “backed out” of the acquisition memory, the DSP block signals the timebase block that it can begin another acquisition. This is a technique that is unique to Keysight’s custom ASIC technology. Traditionally, most other digital storage oscilloscopes would not include this DSP block, but would instead use the scope’s CPU system. That method greatly decreases the efficiency of the scope and slows down the waveform update rate, so you would lose accuracy in your measurements and miss important glitches. Using the DSP block allows Keysight oscilloscopes to always operate at high efficiency and display a waveform that is more true to what is actually coming out of your device.

 DSP block waveform oscilloscope

              You can see the signal goes through quite the lengthy journey before it is displayed on the scope’s screen, but this all happens in the blink of an eye. To learn more about the how an oscilloscope works, download Keysight’s application note, Evaluating Oscilloscope Fundamentals. 

When you are testing a crystal oscillator circuit with an oscilloscope probe, the oscillator may stop oscillating or the waveform may be severely distorted. Why?

 

Every probe functions as an external circuit connected to the device under test. Each probe has its own input resistance, capacitance and inductance, imposing additional load to the DUT. Connecting a probe to the oscillator circuit (or any electronic circuit) adds extra load to a signal or may distort the waveform displayed on the oscilloscope thanks to the loading effect. Therefore, probing an oscillator circuit requires special care, as the oscillator circuit is highly sensitive to capacitance. 

Connecting a probe to the oscillator circuit

Figure 1  Connecting a probe to the oscillator circuit adds extra loads to a signal

 

There are two main factors to consider in choosing a probe for oscillator testing. The first is that the oscilloscope probe is adding capacitance to the existing load capacitors (C1 and C2 in fig 2). The load capacitance is a parameter for determining the frequency of the oscillation circuit. It is important to note that the change in the value of the load capacitance may result in changes in the output frequency of the oscillator or at worst case, it may stop the oscillation. The second factor is that the probe is introducing resistive loading to the oscillator circuit. Both factors can be significant enough to keep the oscillator from working. At DC or low frequency ranges, probe loading is mostly caused by the resistance of the probe, and as the frequency goes up, capacitive component of the probe becomes the dominant factor in the loading effect.

A circuit diagram of a typical oscillator circuit

Figure 2 A circuit diagram of a typical oscillator circuit

 

A solution is to use a probe with high input resistance and low input capacitance in order to cause the lowest possible loading effect. In general, a passive probe with 100:1 attenuation ratio such as Keysight N2876A passive probe (with 2.6 pF of input capacitance) reduces capacitive loading significantly on the circuit, compared to a conventional 10:1 passive probe with ~10 pF of capacitive loading. Loading can be further reduced by switching the oscilloscope input coupling from DC to AC, as DC coupling mode on an oscilloscope presents additional loading to the oscillator and may cause it to stop.

 

Or, better yet, using an active probe with low input loading such as Keysight’s N2795A 1 GHz active probe or N2796A 2 GHz single-ended active probe may deliver better results. This active probe provides 1 Mohm input at DC and low frequencies for low resistance in parallel with <1 pF input capacitance loading to the circuits. Another good probe for oscillator circuit measurement is a Keysight InfiniiMax 1130A Series or N2750A Series InfiniiMode probe that presents even lower loading to the circuit.

Input impedance equivalent model of Keysight N2795A/96A single-ended active probe

Figure 3 Input impedance equivalent model of N2795A/96A single-ended active probe

 

Also, it’s important to note how to connect the probe to the DUT. If your probe connection has obviously longer input lead wires or a connector at the tip, you should suspect frequency response variation and degradation. In general, the longer the input wires or leads of a probe tip, the more it may decrease the bandwidth, increase the loading, cause non-flat frequency response and result in more variation in response. If at all possible, keep the input leads of the probe tip as small as possible, and keep the loop area of connection as small as possible.

Keep the input leads and loop area of connection small for more accurate results

Figure 4 Keep the input leads and the loop area of the connection as small as possible for more accurate results.

If your probe connection has longer input lead wires or a connector, look for frequency response variation and degradation

Figure 5 If your probe connection has obviously longer input lead wires or a connector at the tip, you should look for frequency response variation and degradation.

Today is the day! Today is the day!!

Why is today so important? I’m glad you asked.

Well, for starters, it’s the first day of Scope Month! If you liked last year’s Scope Month, you’re going to love the 2017 version. During the entire month of March, we’re giving away 125 oscilloscopes – that’s more than 3x what we gave away last year. Make sure you enter every day for even more chances to win. Bookmark www.scopemonth.com for easy access to all of the information you need. And, check out the drawings on YouTube each day to see if you’re one of the winners. Don’t want to leave it to chance? Check out the Test to Impress Contest and tell us why you should get a new oscilloscope.

But why else is today so important?

InfiniiVision 1000 X-Series

One of the main Scope Month giveaways is the new InfiniiVision 1000 X-Series, and we just introduced it today! The 1000 X-Series has 50 to 100 MHz bandwidths and a starting price of $449 (USD). This oscilloscope family lets you capture more of your signal and see more signal detail than similarly-priced scopes with its up to 2 GSa/s sampling rate and 50,000 waveforms per second update rate. They feature up to 6-in-1 instrument functionality to give you even more value for your money, and they have 2 analog channels (and the external trigger can be used as a 3rd digital channel). Segmented memory capability maximizes the memory depth while helping the scope test faster. Basically, if you want the best cheap oscilloscope available, you should be looking into the 1000 X-Series.

The 1000 X-Series is ideal for new (or intermediate) oscilloscope users. The front-panel is industry-standard, so you know it’s going to be similar to other oscilloscopes you’ve used (or will use in the future). And getting up to speed on oscilloscope functionality is easy with its built-in help features. So if you’re stuck or want more explanation about a measurement, you can press down and hold any button to access help screens and short setup tips.

 1000 X-Series Oscilloscope built-in1000 X-Series Oscilloscope training signals

   Built-in help comes in 13 different languages                                       11 training signals are built into the scopes

Educators also like the 1000 X-Series because in addition to giving students easy access to help information, an Educators Resource Kit is included at no additional cost. Other vendors usually charge more for their Educators Resource Kit, but Keysight’s 1000 X-Series oscilloscopes come standard with 11 build-in training signals, a comprehensive oscilloscope lab guide, and an oscilloscope fundamentals slide show for professors and lab assistants. Another big draw for educators is the Bode plot capability made possible with the frequency response analyzer in the EDUX1002G and DSOX1102G models.

The 1000 X-Series’ 6-in-1 instrument integration means you’re getting even more out of your oscilloscope investment. In addition to being an oscilloscope, it is also a:

  • Frequency response analyzer (EDUX1002G and DSOX1102G models only)
  • WaveGen function generator (EDUX1002G and DSOX1102G models only)
  • Serial protocol analyzer (with additional software)
  • Digital voltmeter (free with registration)
  • Frequency counter

 

To learn more about the 6-in-1 capability, check out pages 8 and 9 of the 1000 X-Series data sheet.

The 1000 X-Series has professional-quality measurement and software analysis capability. These oscilloscopes have 24 typical oscilloscope measurements to help you quickly analyze signals and determine signal parameters. The gated FFT function gives you additional signal analysis, letting you correlate time and frequency domain on a single screen. Mask limit testing is also available to help you easily detect signal errors. The 1000 X-Series supports analysis and decode of popular embedded and automotive serial bus applications, including I2C, UART/RS232, SPI, CAN and LIN.

1000 X-Series Oscilloscope measurment1000 X-Series Oscilloscope measurment

As you can see, while the 1000 X-Series oscilloscopes are low-cost, Keysight managed to pack a lot of capability into them. Years of Keysight-custom technology and expertise was leveraged to look for ways to aggressively reduce costs while not sacrificing on quality. (But more about that in a later blog post!)

Here are the raw specs, but make sure to check out the 1000 X-Series web page for more information or click here to get a 1000 X-Series quote.

 Models

EDUX1002A

EDUX1002G

DSOX1102A

DSOX1102G

Bandwidth

50 MHz

70/100 MHz

Price

$449 (USD)

$649 (USD)

$649 (USD)

$849 (USD)

Bandwidth upgrade

-

100 MHz opt (DSOX1B7T102)

Display

7 inch WVGA non-touch

Waveform update

50,000 wfms/sec

Vertical sensitivity

500 uV/div ~ 10 V/div

DVM

Free with the customer registration

Channels

2 channel

Probes

1:1, 10:1 switchable 70 MHz

(N2142A)

1:1, 10:1 switchable 200 MHz

(N2140A)

Sampling rate

1 GSa/s

2 GSa/s

Memory

100 kpts standard

1 Mpts standard

Segment memory

-

Standard

Mask/limit test

-

Standard

WaveGen (20 MHz)

-

Yes, standard

-

Yes, standard

Bode plot

-

Yes, standard

-

Yes, standard

Serial decodes

I²C, UART (opt. EDUX1EMBD)

I²C, SPI, UART (opt. DSOX1EMBD) CAN, LIN (opt. DSOX1AUTO)

Warranty

3 year standard (5 year option)

It’s Scope Month, and you know what that means, oscilloscope giveaways! But this year we’re giving you even more chances to win.

 

How?

This year Scope Month includes a scavenger hunt. We have hidden your favorite oscilloscope guru Daniel Bogdanoff all over the world (don’t worry, they’re just life-size cardboard cutouts). Your job? Find Daniel. If you (the scopes community) find Daniel, we will add more scopes to the daily drawings during Scope Month! And the faster that you find him, the more free oscilloscopes it means for you!

 

What do I do?

Watch the Keysight Oscilloscopes Facebook and YouTube channels, because we will release a clue on the whereabouts of Daniel each Monday during Scope Month. Once you have the clue, start searching. If you get stuck, come back to the comments section of this blog post where you can collaborate with the rest of the world and maybe together you can find Daniel sooner. When you find the Daniel cutout, post a picture of it along with the hashtag #GoFindDaniel to the Keysight Oscilloscopes Facebook page or mention @Keysight_Daniel on Twitter so that we know to add more oscilloscopes to the drawing.

 

How many oscilloscopes?

If you find the Daniel cutout by 11:59 pm US Mountain Time (6:59 am UTC time) on Tuesday, we will add FIVE MORE SCOPES to the prize pool for that week. If he is found before midnight on Wednesday, we will give away four more scopes, before midnight on Thursday means three more, midnight on Friday is two more, and if Daniel is found by 11:59 pm on Saturday evening, we will add one extra scope to the prize pool. So work together! The sooner you find the cutout, the more free oscilloscopes we will give away! And you don’t even have to wait long for your reward! The drawings for these additional oscilloscopes will be done on or before the following Monday!

 

Don’t forget to enter the oscilloscope giveaway every day during Scope Month for your chance to win a new Keysight 1000 X-Series oscilloscope.

 

Check out the rest of the Keysight oscilloscope family

 

Terms and Conditions

 

GoFindDaniel CLUE #2: 68747470733a2f2f7777772e796f75747562652e636f6d2f77617463683f763d3645703650425379366945