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Oscilloscopes Blog

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Lab benches are many times cluttered with multiple pieces of test equipment. Keysight’s InfiniiVision Oscilloscopes are equipped with a built in digital voltmeter, frequency counter, and totalizer giving the oscilloscope user additional measurement options that can reduce the amount of test equipment needed. In addition, when you only measure the frequency of a signal, you rarely get the whole story. A repetitive signal can have spurs, intermittent spikes, and noise that you need to see during design and or debug. The oscilloscope counter will show you all of these attributes in addition to the frequency in one screen shot giving you the “big” picture. Keysight InfiniiVision oscilloscopes include both a 3-digit voltmeter (DVM) and a 5-10-digit integrated counter depending upon the oscilloscope model number (Figure 1 below).

 

 Digital Voltmeter

Figure 1 – Functionality, options and specifications across the Keysight InfiniiVision family of Oscilloscopes

 

Digital Volt Meter

The DVM and integrated counter operate through the same probes as the oscilloscope channels. However, these measurements are decoupled from the oscilloscope triggering system measuring 100 points per second. This flexibility allows engineers to make DVM and triggered oscilloscope measurements with the same connection. DVM results are presented with an always-on seven-segment display keeping these quick characterization measurements at the engineers' fingertips. You get the added flexibility of measuring four types of DVM measurements depending upon your application: Peak-Peak, AC rms, DC, and DC rms. As a user you should also note that the oscilloscope DVM is designed for quick rough measurements as needed in design or debug and not meant to replace exact measurements you would get from a calibrated external DVM.

 

Standard 5-digit counter resolution

The traditional oscilloscope counter measurements offer only five or six digits of resolution, which may not be enough for the most critical frequency measurements being made. With a 10-digit counter you can see your measurements with the precision you would normally expect, only from a standalone counter. The Keysight integrated counter’s ability to measure frequencies up to a wide bandwidth of 3.2 GHz allows it to be used in many high-frequency applications. This integrated hardware counter allows users to make much more accurate frequency measurements on signals. Four digits is one part in ten thousand, or ~0.01% of the displayed number. In addition, relative to an industry standard oscilloscope frequency measurement, the Keysight counter measurement is designed to be very easy to use. It uses the trigger level of the oscilloscope as the trigger level for the counter independent of the cycles shown on the screen.

 

Up to 8 to 10-digit resolution with external time base

If an external 10MHz reference is used, the counter is as accurate as the externally fed 10MHz signal, and the measurement resolution is increased. The 10MHz REF BNC connector on the rear panel is provided so you can supply a more accurate clock signal to the oscilloscope. To drive oscilloscope’s time base from external clock reference, connect a 10MHz square or sine wave reference signal to the 10MHz REF BNC input on the rear panel, and go to the Utility -> Options ->Rear Panel menu and select Ref signal mode to 10 MHz input. The working 10MHz input voltage is 180mV to 1V in amplitude, with a 0V to 2V offset. To get the highest resolution, the time/div setting should be at 200mS/div or slower. With this setting, the resolution is increased up to 8 digits, which is what would be displayed if an external 10MHz reference is used. When the internal reference is used, the oscilloscope displays counter measurement in 5 digits. The counter measurements can measure frequencies up to the bandwidth of the oscilloscope.

 

Accuracy

Basically, the counter is as accurate as the time base reference that is used.  The oscilloscope’s time base uses a built-in 10MHz reference that has an accuracy of 1.6 ppm to 50 ppm depending upon the oscilloscope model number. This means that the number displayed is within 0.00016% to 0.0050% respectively of the actual signal measured. For example, if you are making a counter measurement of 32,768 Hz signal using a model 6000X with 1.6 ppm accuracy, you are measuring the signal at ~0.05 Hz accuracy (see calculation below).

32,768 Hz x 1.6 ppm (0.00016%) = ±0.0524288 Hz

 

Totalizer

The totalizer feature of the DSOXDVMCTR counter option adds another valuable capability to the oscilloscope. It can count the number of events (totalize), and it also can monitor the number of trigger-condition-qualified events. The trigger-qualified events totalizer does not require an actual trigger to occur. It only requires a trigger-satisfying event to take place. In other words, the totalizer can monitor events faster than the trigger rate of an oscilloscope, in some cases as fast as 25 million events per second. Keep in mind that the number of events is a function of the oscilloscope’s hold off time.

 

Summary

The voltmeter and counter functions discussed in this article are just two of the “6 instruments in one oscilloscope” of the Keysight InfiniiVision family. The six instruments are the oscilloscope, 16 digital channels (mixed signal), serial protocol analyzer, Dual channel 20 MHz function/arbitrary waveform generator, 3-digit voltmeter, and 5 to 10-digit counter with totalizer.

 

The voltmeter operates through the same probes as the oscilloscope channels. However, the DVM measurements are made independently from the oscilloscope acquisition and triggering system, so you can make both the DVM and triggered oscilloscope waveform captures with the same connection.

 

Traditional oscilloscope counter measurements offer only five or six digits of resolution. While this level of precision is fine for quick measurements, it falls short of expectations when critical frequency measurements are needed. With the integrated counter within the five Keysight oscilloscope families summarized in Figure 1, you can select between 5 and 10 digit counter options and see your measurements with the precision you would normally expect only from a standalone counter. Because the integrated counter measures frequencies up to a wide bandwidth of 3.2 GHz, you can use it for many high-frequency applications as well.

This blog was written by Ailee Grumbine- Keysight Memory Solutions Product Manager

 

As a design engineer, your job is to design the best product. Your manager’s job is to reduce the number of redesigns and deal with engineering shortages and budget constraints. Your manager asked for test results to decide if your product is ready for release to production. You would spend days analyzing the test results to gain confidence that your product is good. You then translate the information into graphs and test reports that are presentable to your manager. Does this all sound familiar?

 

Data analytics is the answer for overcoming these challenges. In the test and measurement industry, designers use test equipment to help determine if their design meets the industry passing criteria for device certifications. Data sources include test results from compliance test software, simulation software, multiple vendors test equipment, and individual company’s proprietary measurement tools. Data collected is exported to a data repository server or cloud which is accessible by a globally distributed design team. Data analytics with visualization tools helps the decision making process more intuitive and a lot faster. The visualization tools include line and histogram charts with pass fail limits and statistical information. The image below shows an example of a measurement jitter histogram plot of different ASIC names. It reveals that the two ASICs, SERDES 700 and SERDES 701. Both have the same histogram mode and profile while SERDES 702 doesn’t have enough measurement to conclude its performance. You may want to hold off SERDES 702 for release to production.

Histogram Plot of jitter measurment

Histogram plot of jitter measurement on three different SERDES 

 

The next example is a bit error measurement against input voltage for different ASIC versions. Alpha, beta, and gamma versions have the same bit error measurements, while delta version is performing better with lower bit error measurement. You could conclude that delta version ASIC has better performance compared to the other versions. It could also be that there is discrepancy in the way the measurement is made that causes the outlier behavior.  You should also look at other possible contributing factors such as test equipment, test bench, and the engineer who made the measurement.  

 line plot of bit errors

Line plot of bit errors on four different ASIC versions

 

The visualization tool is the easy part of setting up data analytics capability. The hard part is setting up a web server that would interact with the data repository server for data upload and access. The data repository server has to be secured and has the support for backup, restore, and replication. It is highly recommended to have company’s internal IT department support in setting up the data repository server. The web server hosts the data analytics web server application software. It needs to support massive data upload via streaming or bulk transfer. It needs to be OS and programming language independent. It has to protect the data from any corruption and ensures consistency. It is recommended that the web server and the data repository server is setup using two separate servers to allow for scalability, performance, and data repository security.  You can collect the data in a .CSV file with measurements and properties information. Example of properties are temperature, test bench names, ASIC names, ASIC versions, and test engineers. Measurements can be jitter, bit error, input voltage, and power. For most measurements, there are upper and lower limits which would tell the design engineer the margins they have in their design.

 

Being ahead of the competition and doing it in the most cost efficient manner have a positive business impact. Hence, data analytics features are designed to work with all measurement data collection methods to allow for simple, quick, non-tedious integration into the design and characterization work flow. Important data analytics software features would include a web server application to enable real time huge data import and access. It would also support visualization tools with different chart options to enable fast and intuitive data analysis for making quick decisions. All of these elements should build an infrastructure that would support data analytics successfully in your company.

What does the piezoelectric effect have to do with oscilloscopes? If you follow any of the electrical engineering YouTube channels, you’re likely familiar with Dave Jones & the EEVBlog. His latest video caught my eye “EEVBlog #983 – A Shocking Oscilloscope Problem”. Now, this made me stop in my tracks. Not because he’s highlighting an oscilloscope “problem,” but because after waiting for 982 videos, Dave thought this topic was finally worth using the word “shocking” as a pun. I don’t know about you, but if I had made 982 videos, I’d probably have played that card already. Although, our Keysight Oscilloscopes YouTube channel just broke 250 videos and we haven’t done it yet, so you never know.

 

Anyways, what could be such a big deal? As it turns out the topic is actually, well (sigh) shocking. Who knew that simply bumping an oscilloscope the wrong way could cause mystery signals to appear on the screen? What makes this happen? It occurs because the ceramic capacitors in the oscilloscope’s acquisition system act as a piezoelectric material. Whether you are using a cheap oscilloscope or a high end oscilloscope, the piezoelectric effect is something to be aware of.

 

How does piezoelectricity work?

Piezoelectric materials are crystalline substances that produce an electric potential when subjected to mechanical stress.  Think about a crystal lattice. In general, a material’s molecules form into crystals because that is its most stable state. The molecular charges are arranged in an electrically neutral arrangement. Essentially, the positive and negative charges are all at a happy equilibrium. But as soon as an external physical pressure distorts the crystal structure, there will be an imbalance of charge. Take Fig 01 (GIF) for example. In a normal, non-compressed state the 2D lattice is at equilibrium. But as it’s compressed, the positive and negative charges “squish” out to opposite ends and create a potential across the structure. Basically, the lattice stops being an electrically neutral structure and has a charge distribution.

 

 

 Alternatively, you can apply a voltage to a crystalline structure and it will physically change the shape of the crystal – the “reverse piezoelectric effect.” This is especially useful if you want to generate or sense physical time-varying waves.

 

The piezoelectric effect and oscilloscopes

What does the piezoelectric effect have to do with oscilloscopes? Try this and see for yourself:

 

  1. Grab a standard 10:1 passive probe and connect it to your oscilloscope
  2. Zoom in vertically on your signal to a small voltage per division setting
  3. Set your trigger level slightly above your baseline signal
  4. Remove the probe’s grabber hat & tap the exposed probe tip on a hard surface
  5. Don’t panic and always carry a towel

 

You should then see a signal show up on your screen. Remember, you may have to put your oscilloscope into “Normal” trigger mode to keep the signal onscreen. Alternatively, you may be able to forgo the probe all together and simply tap on a bare BNC or even the top of the chassis (like in Figure 2). Now, don’t panic, this is a behavior that every scope in existence exhibits. It’s worth noting that I had to smack the oscilloscope pretty stinking hard to get this strong of an effect.

 

Scope Slap

A hand-numbingly hard slap demonstrates the piezoelectric effect on the Keysight InfiniiVision 1000 X-Series

 

A signal is showing up on the oscilloscope because designers use ceramic capacitors in both probes and in oscilloscope acquisition boards. Ceramic is a piezoelectric material, and the vibrations caused by physical force you exert on your probe and/or scope cause the capacitors to physically expand and contract slightly. This expansion and contraction creates an electric potential in the capacitors. Because these capacitors are part of the oscilloscopes acquisition system, that potential shows up on the oscilloscope screen. “So…” you ask me once you’re done hyperventilating, “have all of my measurements been bogus up to this point? Can I minimize this effect? Is this something I should worry about?”

 

No, yes, and probably not.

 

Unless you are working in the middle of a city-destroying earthquake or on the back of a kangaroo, you probably don’t have anything to worry about. Keysight oscilloscopes all go through extensive environmental and stress testing, including drop tests (up to 30 g’s of force!) and time on a vibration table (Fig 3). So, for Keysight oscilloscopes you can be confident that every-day vibrations won’t affect your measurements (but I can’t speak for other manufacturer’s testing procedures). If you are extra concerned about this or work on the back of a kangaroo, try using an equipment cart or table that has built-in suspension.

 

Drop Table

An Infiniivision 1000 X-Series oscilloscope being drop-tested. Just because it’s an inexpensive oscilloscope doesn’t mean it’s not rugged!

 

Wrapping up

Clearly, under the right circumstances, you can visibly observe the piezoelectric effect on your oscilloscopes. However, in my years at Keysight, I have not seen a single instance of this ever effecting an engineer’s measurements. To borrow the words of Mike from Mike’sElectricStuff:

Patient to Doctor: “Doc, it hurts when I do this!”

Doctor to Patient: “Don’t do that!”

The latest Infiniium software release (for Infiniium oscilloscopes and Infiniium Offline on your PC) includes a handful of new and improved tools to help you make more efficient measurements and documentation.

These updates include:

  • MIPI SPMI Protocol Decode
  • Generic Raw Decode for PAM-4 and NRZ
  • Symbolic Decode added to ARINC 429 and MIL-STD-1553 protocol decode 
  • Segmented Memory improvements
  • Measurement Reports
  • S-Parameter Viewer
  • Windows 10 Support

 

MIPI SPMI Protocol Trigger and Decode – N8845A

If you’re designing mobile devices, our new SPMI (System Power Management Interface) protocol decode license might interest you. SPMI is used to communicate from power controllers to one or multiple power management chips with up to 4 masters and 16 slaves on one bus. SPMI allows you to reduce the number of pins on your power controllers, reducing the size of your mobile designs. With Keysight’s SPMI protocol decode option you can decode and debug these designs. Like I always say when it comes to protocol decode software, have the oscilloscope decode for you so you can get right to the fun part - analyzing and debugging.

Figure 1 - MIPI SPMI protocol decode

 

Generic Raw Decode

You may have a proprietary bus or customized protocol that others may not have defined a specific protocol decode for. This means you don’t have the option of buying a convenient protocol decode license that will trigger and decode your serial bus, group bits, label packet types, and flag errors for you. However, you can still get the binary data extracted from your analog waveform. With Generic Raw, you can decode your NRZ and PAM-4 signals so you can process and analyze the data yourself. This software extracts the raw bit data from the analog signal based on the clock recovery and thresholds that you set. Generic Raw has one mode for NRZ* signals and another for PAM-4** signals.

Figure 2 - Generic Raw PAM-4 decode

 

Symbolic Decode – N8842A

If you’re working with ARINC 429 and MIL-STD-1553 protocols, this update is for you. How many of us sit with our protocol binders in our lap to translate the Hex values to meaningful English? It’s time to toss that binder in a desk drawer. Load your .xml file into the oscilloscope to view your protocol decode in ASCII instead of Hex. Look at the examples below to see the two versions side by side.

ARINC 429 protocol decode:

Figure 3 - ARINC 429 decode in Hex

 

ARINC 429 protocol decode with symbolic decode:

 

 Figure 4 - ARINC 429 decode in ASCII

 

 

Segmented Memory Updates

Segmented memory is a great way to make the most of your oscilloscope’s memory, especially if you have specific events of interest separated by long amounts of time that you don’t really care about. An example of this is a serial bus. You’ll be looking at a waveform with packets of data separated by dead time. You can acquire waveform data just around the trigger conditions you set – for example, a specific packet type or an error. Then you can view this same packet type as it changes over time, comparing the packets captured in each acquisition. Now segmented memory has been improved to make your life even easier with the following:

  • Auto Play - automatically play through all the segments after acquisition is completed
  • Time between segment playback is reduced to zero – optimized performance saving you time
  • Persistent data is preserved – you can view all your segments laid on top of each other to see how your signal changes between packets in one view
  • Measurement Log – track the changes in measurements over the number of acquisitions you specify

 

 

Measurement Reports

 

Have you ever had to compile measurement reports to keep records of exact test conditions, equipment settings, and measurement results? Now, the oscilloscope can do it all for you in a couple clicks. No more copying and pasting screenshots, pulling together separate setup files and recording the software versions, and organizing them into your favorite text editor. The 6.0 Infiniium software now provides a way to generate hassle free reports that include all of the information you’d want to record and keep in your archives for proof of your test results.

 

Measurement reports provide, in a single file, measurement results and screenshots, plus all the information about your oscilloscope setup including:

 

  • Oscilloscope configuration with model number and software version
  • Calibration status of the frame and individual channels
  • Acquisition settings
  • Horizontal settings
  • Bandwidth limits and filter type
  • Vertical and channel settings
  • Trigger setup

 

You can save your report as PDF or as MHTML (*.mht) format files. MHTML is a webpage archive format that includes images and html all in one file so you don’t have to save images and text based content separately.

 

S-Parameter Viewer

If you are using InfiniiSim to apply transfer functions to your waveform – useful when you want to model the effects of a probe or RC circuit on your design – there is now an option to view the s-parameters. Being able to view the s-parameters before applying it to your waveform can be a nice sanity check before you end up spending hours trying to understand why your circuit behaves so unexpectedly because you accidentally uploaded the wrong file (it’s happened to the best of us).

 

Figure 5 - S-Parameter Viewer

 

Windows 10

Infiniium software now supports Windows 10. If you are running Windows 10 on your PC, Infiniium Offline is now compatible! For a free trial of the Infiniium software, click here.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

*Standard with SDA option

**Requires PAM-4 Compliance App and SDA option

If you are working on embedded designs such as automotive controllers, sensors, actuators, avionics, weapons systems, transmitting uncompressed audio and video data, or other chip-to-chip communications, you are probably using protocols and need a way to decode serial buses.

Protocol decode is the process of translating an electrical signal from a serial bus into meaningful bit sequences as defined by the standards of the protocol being analyzed. As we use serial buses in our designs to communicate from one device to another, we often need to debug our designs and verify we are sending the messages, or bit packets, that we intend to send.

One way to do this is to manually decode the signal. To do this, first you must capture the signal on an oscilloscope. Next, break apart the signal into one bit time slices and count the stream of ones and zeroes. Then group the sequence of bits and decode by the specifications of the protocol you are using. An example of this process is shown in the image below. This example is of a CAN bus.

Figure 1 - Decoding a CAN bus by hand

While this exercise might make an interesting learning experience for engineering students, this is a tedious and obsolete way to decode. Now days, you can decode your serial buses using a protocol analyzer or protocol decode software on your oscilloscope. This oscilloscope software will count the bits and compartmentalize the data into meaningful packets based on the definitions of the protocol you are using. With many oscilloscopes, you can even view the protocol decode results in a lister window.

 

Keysight InfiniiVision and Infiniium oscilloscopes display the original waveform, a time aligned decode trace for the data captured on screen, and a lister which is a text based table. The lister displays all the data packets, the time at which they occurred, the type of packet, and other relevant packet information specific to the protocol in use. Additionally, the lister will include the error type if an error was detected. Below is an example of CAN protocol decode performed on an InfiniiVision oscilloscope:

Figure 2 - CAN Protocol Decode performed by InfiniiVision oscilloscope

To find errors by hand you’d have to cross reference the packets you decoded with the packets you were trying to send at that point in the sequence and check if you have errors. Plus, you would be limited to the part of the waveform you could view on screen. As you can imagine, this is tedious. However, protocol decode software can find errors for you. Plus, with Keysight oscilloscopes, you can even trigger on errors or a specified packet type so you can easily find and analyze the events that interest you.

If you are looking for an entry level, affordable oscilloscope, the Keysight InfiniiVision 1000X-Series oscilloscopes have the ability to perform protocol hardware trigger and decode of I2C, SPI, UART/RS-232, CAN, and LIN buses.

1000 X-Series Oscilloscope

Figure 3 - Keysight 1000X-Series oscilloscope

If you are looking for an oscilloscope with higher bandwidth and additional capabilities, the Infiniium oscilloscopes offer several more protocol decode options including 8B/10B, ARINC 429, MIL-STD-1553, CAN, CAN-FD, LIN, FlexRay, DVI, HDMI, I2C, SPI, RS-232/UART, JTAG, several MIPI protocols, PCI Express, SATA/SAS, SVID, USB2.0, USB 3.0, USB 3.1, USB PD, and eSPI.

This variety of protocol decode addresses several industries. For example, the automotive industry often use CAN (Controller Area Network), CAN-FD (Controller Area Network – Flexible Data-rate), LIN (Local Interconnect Network), and FlexRay. These are the main buses used for automotive controllers, sensors, and actuators used throughout our vehicles. Designers in this space will want to be able to debug the physical layer of their designs. And because it is so important to have reliable systems in our automobiles, it is important to have reliable decode software.

Other buses that are important to have properly tested and reliable designs are ARINC 429 and MIL-STD-1553. These are often used in military equipment such as avionics, weapons systems, or ground vehicles.

As USB (Universal Serial Bus) has become so popular and continues to advance quickly, it is important to have the ability to decode both legacy USB protocols such as USB 2.0 and the newer USB protocols such as USB 3.1, and USB Power Delivery.   USB is everywhere now with its use in smartphones, computer peripheral devices, cameras, power chargers for hand held devices, and drones.

High definition televisions and displays usually use HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface) protocol for transmitting uncompressed audio and video data. DVI (Digital Visual Interface) is also used to transmit digital video.

Buses used for Short distances with integrated circuits include I2C and SPI.

Serial buses are used everywhere. With the ability to set up the decode in less than 30 seconds, set up specialized triggers and search on specific packet types or errors, and expand the amount of useful data captured with segmented memory, oscilloscopes make decoding serial buses much more efficient than decoding by hand. Protocol decode software on oscilloscopes help you quickly move from decoding to analysis and debugging.

Professor BodeWhen I was an electrical engineering student back in the 1970’s at the University of South Florida — go bulls! — two of my favorite classes were Control Systems and Analog Circuit Fundamentals. One reason I loved these classes so much was because we got to create Bode plots. I know, that sounds weird. I really enjoyed finding the theoretical poles and zeros and drawing Bode plots on my green engineering graph paper by hand (pencil, paper, and a ruler). Thank you Professor Bode; you are my hero! But when it came time to go into the lab to verify the frequency response of something like a passive or active filter design that we were assigned to build and test, there were no frequency response analyzers (sometimes called network analyzers) to be found.

 

In those days network analyzers were highly specialized and expensive multi-box systems from test and measurement vendors, including Hewlett-Packard (Keysight’s predecessor). Without

access to one of these expensive instruments in my EE lab, the testing process consisted of taking multiple VIN, VOUT, and Δt measurements on an oscilloscope while changing the input sine wave frequency on a function generator. After making 15 or 20 measurements, I would have enough measured data points to convert to gain (20LogVOUT/VIN) and phase shift (Δt/T x 360) using my trusty slide rule. I would then plot the results back onto that green engineering graph paper alongside the theoretical plots for comparison.

 

The days of plotting theoretical results by hand are over. Most engineering students today use MATLAB® to do that. And certainly the days of taking multiple VIN and VOUT measurements in the lab using an oscilloscope and a function generator set at discreet frequencies must be over, right? After all, the test and measurement industry now offers a broad range of frequency response analyzers (FRA) and vector network analyzers (VNA) that create gain and phase plots automagically. But those days aren’t over! Most undergraduate EE teaching labs are not equipped with frequency response analyzers. Almost all EE students today use the same tedious method of testing a circuit’s frequency response that I used back in ancient times. Why is that?

 

FRAs and VNAs are still considered by many to be a specialized instrument — especially in the university environment. In addition, the price of these instruments start at around US $5,000 and go up from there. This may not sound like much for someone in the high tech industry that depends on this type of instrument to get to their testing done quickly, but almost all universities have to operate on a tight budget. A typical student lab bench (consisting of an entry-level 2-channel oscilloscope, function generator, digital voltmeter (DVM), and power supply) can be purchased for about US $2,000 today. To equip an entire student teaching lab with an FRA at an additional US $5,000 per test station would blow most EE lab budgets out of the water.


 1000 X-Series Oscilloscope

But now the process of making multiple VIN and VOUT oscilloscope measurements to create Bode gain and phase plots are about to be over for many EE students – at least for students at universities that equip their labs with a new Keysight oscilloscope. Keysight just introduced a family of low-cost oscilloscopes with an optional built-in function generator (Figure 2). And the best part is that automatic frequency response analysis (Bode gain and phase plots) can be performed on these student oscilloscopes at no additional charge on models that come equipped with the built-in WaveGen function generator and frequency response analysis (EDUX1002G and DSOX1102G). All of this functionality (oscilloscope, function generator, and frequency response analysis) can be had for just over US $600. Let’s take a look at a measurement example of characterizing a passive bandpass filter using this new oscilloscope.

Passive RLC bandpass filter

Figure 3 shows the schematic of a simple RLC circuit that we will test. At lower frequencies, the 1-µF capacitor dominates the impedance (XC = 1/2πfC) of this circuit and blocks most of VIN from getting to VOUT. At higher frequencies, the 10-µH inductor (XL = 2πfL) blocks most of the input from getting to the output. But in the mid-band frequencies, the 50-Ω load resistor dominates such that most of VIN reaches VOUT (~0 dB). By definition, this is a bandpass filter. We will now test it with Keysight’s new oscilloscope with the built-in function generator and frequency response analysis capability.

 

We begin by connecting the output of the generator to VIN and also probe VIN and VOUT with channel 1 and channel 2 of the oscilloscope, respectively. Figure 4 shows the frequency response analysis setup menu, which displays a block diagram to assist us in making proper connections. This is also where we can define which of the oscilloscope’s input channels is probing VIN, which channel is probing VOUT, the minimum test frequency, maximum test frequency, and test amplitude. For this test, we will use all the default settings. When we select Run Analysis, the oscilloscope executes the one-time  test, sometimes called a "sweep."

Figure 5 shows the test results. The blue trace represents gain (in dB) with scale factors shown on the left side of the display, while the orange trace represents phase (in degrees) with scale factors shown on the right side of the display. A pair of markers is also available to measure gain and phase at any frequency. The oscilloscope even optimizes magnitude and phase scaling factors automatically. But you also have the ability to establish your own scale factors manually after completion of the test. This is probably the easiest-to-use frequency response analyzer on the market today. At least that’s my opinion. And it has to be the least-expensive FRA because it comes standard (US $0) with the purchase of an EDUX1002G or DSOX1102G oscilloscope, which is only US $200 more than the baseline 1000 X-Series model (US $449). But performance is not sacrificed. Using a proprietary measurement algorithm, this instrument can achieve up to 80 dB of dynamic range based on a 0 dBm (224 mVrms) input.

 

Using this new Keysight oscilloscope capability has sure saved me a lot of time in my job. And I bet it will save EE students a lot of time as well so they can complete their lab assignments on time!

 

 

MATLAB is a registered trademark of MathWork, Inc.

The second the probe is connected to your device your signal begins a grand journey to the center of the scope. It has to pass through five phases in order to complete its journey to the center, then back up to the surface. First the signal has to find its way to the front of the scope through the probe. Then, once it enters the scope, it has to go through an attenuator, DC offset, and amplifier before it can reach the center. At the center, the signal goes through an analog to digital converter. In order to make its way back to the surface of the scope, it must venture to find the display DSP. Along the way, it finds evidence that signals have been here before. The timebase and acquisition blocks show that previous samples of signals have been collected. Once the signal passes through these two blocks, it will finally be displayed on the surface of the scope. Let’s learn a little bit more about everything your signal encounters along this journey.

Oscilloscope Signal

 

Your signal’s journey begins with traveling from your device through a series of resistive and capacitive components inside the probe. The attenuation specification of your probe will determine what resistive components are inside. Most standard passive voltage probes that come with DSO scopes have a 10:1 attenuation ratio. This type of probe would have a 9 MΩ probe tip resistor in series with the scope’s 1 MΩ input impedance. This would make the resistance at the probe tip 10 MΩ, which means that when your signal travels through the probe and reaches the scope’s input, it will be 1/10th of the voltage level that it was when it entered the probe at the tip from your device. This means that the dynamic range of the scope measurement system has been extended because you can now measure signals with 10x higher amplitude as compared to signals you could measure using a 1:1 probe. Also, this 10:1 passive probe ensures a high input impedance at the probe tip which will eliminate any loading on your device. Loading will change the way your device behaves, and we don’t want that.

Analog Input Signal Conditioning

 

Next the signal enters the scope to begin the first phase of processing, analog input signal conditioning. There are three stages to this conditioning process which are all done in order to scale the waveform correctly to be within the dynamic range of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and the amplifier. The processing done in these stages is dependent on what the V/div and offset settings are, which ultimately depends on whether you are measuring a low level or high level signal. First, the signal is scaled in the attenuator block, which is a network of resistor dividers. If you have a high level input signal, then the signal will be attenuated, or reduced. If you are inputting a low-level signal, then the signal will be passed through to the next step without any attenuation. You may often be inputting a signal that has a DC offset, but we want to be able to display that signal in the center of the screen at 0 V. In order to make that happen, there is an internal DC offset of the opposite polarity that is added to the signal to shift the scale. This way it will display on the center of the screen. Lastly, the signal travels into the variable gain amplifier. This type of amplifier will either increase or decrease the gain of your signal dependent on what your V/div setting. So, this again depends on whether you are looking at a low or high level signal. If you are working with a low level signal, you are likely at a low V/div setting which would tell the amplifier the gain should be increased so that we are utilizing the full range of the ADC. If you are working with a high level signal, then the signal would have been attenuated back in the first stage of this process, and the amplifier may then further attenuate the signal in this stage by decreasing the gain, again to scale the signal within the dynamic range of the ADC.

Analog to Digital Conversion and Trigger Blocks

 

Now that the signal is conditioned to be within the dynamic range of the ADC, it can enter the center of the scope and the analog to digital conversion can begin. The ADC block is the core component of all DSOs. This is where the analog input signal gets converted into a series of digital words. Most of today’s DSOs utilize 8-bit ADCs which will provide 256 unique digital output levels/codes. These digital binary codes are stored in the scope’s acquisition memory, which will be discussed later. In order to obtain the highest resolution and accurate measurements, the scope will try to use the full dynamic range of the ADC. While the signal is being converted in the ADC, the scope is also processing the trigger conditions needed to establish a unique point in time on the input signal upon which to establish a synchronized acquisition. Depending on what you set the trigger acquisition settings to on the scope, the trigger comparator block will output a non-inverted waveform with a duty cycle that is dependent on what you set the trigger level to. Then, depending on what you set the trigger type to (rising edge, falling edge, etc.) the trigger logic block will either invert the waveform before allowing it to pass through, or it will allow the non-inverted waveform to be passed through to the next step. This trigger signal is then used in the timebase block in the next step as the unique synchronization point in time.

Timebase and Acquisition Memory Blocks

 

              The timebase block controls when ADC sampling is started and stopped relative to the trigger event that was just determined in the previous step. In addition, the timebase block controls the ADCs sample rate based on the scope’s available acquisition memory depth and the timebase setting. When the Run key is pressed, the timebase block enables continuous storing of the digitized data into the scope’s “circular” acquisition memory at the appropriate sample rate. While the timebase block increments addressing of the circular acquisition memory buffer after each sample, it also counts the number of samples taken up to a certain number which is dependent on the memory depth of the scope along with the trigger position. Once the timebase block determines that the minimum required number of samples of your signal have been collected, the timebase block enables triggering and begins to look for the first qualifying point of the output trigger comparator. Once the trigger event is detected, the timebase block then begins collecting the required number of samples. Once all of the samples have been stored, the timebase block disables the sampling and the process is pushed on to the next step.

 Display DSP Block

             

              Your signal has now reached the final stage in its journey. Once the acquisition of all of the samples has been completed, the data in the acquisition memory is “backed out” in a last-in-first-out sequence. The signal is reconstructed from the samples and the data is put into the scope’s pixel display memory and it is ultimately displayed on the screen. Once all of the data has been “backed out” of the acquisition memory, the DSP block signals the timebase block that it can begin another acquisition. This is a technique that is unique to Keysight’s custom ASIC technology. Traditionally, most other DSO oscilloscopes would not include this DSP block, but would instead use the scope’s CPU system. That method greatly decreases the efficiency of the scope and slows down the waveform update rate, so you would lose accuracy in your measurements and miss important glitches. Using the DSP block allows Keysight scopes to always operate at high efficiency and display a waveform that is more true to what is actually coming out of your device.

 DSP block waveform oscilloscope

              You can see the signal goes through quite the lengthy journey before it is displayed on the scope’s screen, but this all happens in the blink of an eye. To learn more about the fundamentals of oscilloscopes, download Keysight’s application note, Evaluating Oscilloscope Fundamentals. 

The second the probe is connected to your device your signal begins a grand journey to the center of the scope. It has to pass through five phases in order to complete its journey to the center, then back up to the surface. First the signal has to find its way to the front of the scope through the probe. Then, once it enters the scope, it has to go through an attenuator, DC offset, and amplifier before it can reach the center. At the center, the signal goes through an analog to digital converter. In order to make its way back to the surface of the scope, it must venture to find the display DSP. Along the way, it finds evidence that signals have been here before. The timebase and acquisition blocks show that previous samples of signals have been collected. Once the signal passes through these two blocks, it will finally be displayed on the surface of the scope. Let’s learn a little bit more about everything your signal encounters along this journey.

Oscilloscope Signal

 

Your signal’s journey begins with traveling from your device through a series of resistive and capacitive components inside the probe. The attenuation specification of your probe will determine what resistive components are inside. Most standard passive voltage probes that come with DSO scopes have a 10:1 attenuation ratio. This type of probe would have a 9 MΩ probe tip resistor in series with the scope’s 1 MΩ input impedance. This would make the resistance at the probe tip 10 MΩ, which means that when your signal travels through the probe and reaches the scope’s input, it will be 1/10th of the voltage level that it was when it entered the probe at the tip from your device. This means that the dynamic range of the scope measurement system has been extended because you can now measure signals with 10x higher amplitude as compared to signals you could measure using a 1:1 probe. Also, this 10:1 passive probe ensures a high input impedance at the probe tip which will eliminate any loading on your device. Loading will change the way your device behaves, and we don’t want that.

Analog Input Signal Conditioning

 

Next the signal enters the scope to begin the first phase of processing, analog input signal conditioning. There are three stages to this conditioning process which are all done in order to scale the waveform correctly to be within the dynamic range of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and the amplifier. The processing done in these stages is dependent on what the V/div and offset settings are, which ultimately depends on whether you are measuring a low level or high level signal. First, the signal is scaled in the attenuator block, which is a network of resistor dividers. If you have a high level input signal, then the signal will be attenuated, or reduced. If you are inputting a low-level signal, then the signal will be passed through to the next step without any attenuation. You may often be inputting a signal that has a DC offset, but we want to be able to display that signal in the center of the screen at 0 V. In order to make that happen, there is an internal DC offset of the opposite polarity that is added to the signal to shift the scale. This way it will display on the center of the screen. Lastly, the signal travels into the variable gain amplifier. This type of amplifier will either increase or decrease the gain of your signal dependent on what your V/div setting. So, this again depends on whether you are looking at a low or high level signal. If you are working with a low level signal, you are likely at a low V/div setting which would tell the amplifier the gain should be increased so that we are utilizing the full range of the ADC. If you are working with a high level signal, then the signal would have been attenuated back in the first stage of this process, and the amplifier may then further attenuate the signal in this stage by decreasing the gain, again to scale the signal within the dynamic range of the ADC.

Analog to Digital Conversion and Trigger Blocks

 

Now that the signal is conditioned to be within the dynamic range of the ADC, it can enter the center of the scope and the analog to digital conversion can begin. The ADC block is the core component of all DSOs. This is where the analog input signal gets converted into a series of digital words. Most of today’s DSOs utilize 8-bit ADCs which will provide 256 unique digital output levels/codes. These digital binary codes are stored in the scope’s acquisition memory, which will be discussed later. In order to obtain the highest resolution and accurate measurements, the scope will try to use the full dynamic range of the ADC. While the signal is being converted in the ADC, the scope is also processing the trigger conditions needed to establish a unique point in time on the input signal upon which to establish a synchronized acquisition. Depending on what you set the trigger acquisition settings to on the scope, the trigger comparator block will output a non-inverted waveform with a duty cycle that is dependent on what you set the trigger level to. Then, depending on what you set the trigger type to (rising edge, falling edge, etc.) the trigger logic block will either invert the waveform before allowing it to pass through, or it will allow the non-inverted waveform to be passed through to the next step. This trigger signal is then used in the timebase block in the next step as the unique synchronization point in time.

Timebase and Acquisition Memory Blocks

 

              The timebase block controls when ADC sampling is started and stopped relative to the trigger event that was just determined in the previous step. In addition, the timebase block controls the ADCs sample rate based on the scope’s available acquisition memory depth and the timebase setting. When the Run key is pressed, the timebase block enables continuous storing of the digitized data into the scope’s “circular” acquisition memory at the appropriate sample rate. While the timebase block increments addressing of the circular acquisition memory buffer after each sample, it also counts the number of samples taken up to a certain number which is dependent on the memory depth of the scope along with the trigger position. Once the timebase block determines that the minimum required number of samples of your signal have been collected, the timebase block enables triggering and begins to look for the first qualifying point of the output trigger comparator. Once the trigger event is detected, the timebase block then begins collecting the required number of samples. Once all of the samples have been stored, the timebase block disables the sampling and the process is pushed on to the next step.

 Display DSP Block

             

              Your signal has now reached the final stage in its journey. Once the acquisition of all of the samples has been completed, the data in the acquisition memory is “backed out” in a last-in-first-out sequence. The signal is reconstructed from the samples and the data is put into the scope’s pixel display memory and it is ultimately displayed on the screen. Once all of the data has been “backed out” of the acquisition memory, the DSP block signals the timebase block that it can begin another acquisition. This is a technique that is unique to Keysight’s custom ASIC technology. Traditionally, most other DSO oscilloscopes would not include this DSP block, but would instead use the scope’s CPU system. That method greatly decreases the efficiency of the scope and slows down the waveform update rate, so you would lose accuracy in your measurements and miss important glitches. Using the DSP block allows Keysight scopes to always operate at high efficiency and display a waveform that is more true to what is actually coming out of your device.

 DSP block waveform oscilloscope

              You can see the signal goes through quite the lengthy journey before it is displayed on the scope’s screen, but this all happens in the blink of an eye. To learn more about the fundamentals of oscilloscopes, download Keysight’s application note, Evaluating Oscilloscope Fundamentals. 

When you are testing a crystal oscillator circuit with an oscilloscope probe, the oscillator may stop oscillating or the waveform may be severely distorted. Why?

 

Every probe functions as an external circuit connected to the device under test. Each probe has its own input resistance, capacitance and inductance, imposing additional load to the DUT. Connecting a probe to the oscillator circuit (or any electronic circuit) adds extra load to a signal or may distort the waveform displayed on the oscilloscope thanks to the loading effect. Therefore, probing an oscillator circuit requires special care, as the oscillator circuit is highly sensitive to capacitance. 

Connecting a probe to the oscillator circuit

Figure 1  Connecting a probe to the oscillator circuit adds extra loads to a signal

 

There are two main factors to consider in choosing a probe for oscillator testing. The first is that the oscilloscope probe is adding capacitance to the existing load capacitors (C1 and C2 in fig 2). The load capacitance is a parameter for determining the frequency of the oscillation circuit. It is important to note that the change in the value of the load capacitance may result in changes in the output frequency of the oscillator or at worst case, it may stop the oscillation. The second factor is that the probe is introducing resistive loading to the oscillator circuit. Both factors can be significant enough to keep the oscillator from working. At DC or low frequency ranges, probe loading is mostly caused by the resistance of the probe, and as the frequency goes up, capacitive component of the probe becomes the dominant factor in the loading effect.

A circuit diagram of a typical oscillator circuit

Figure 2 A circuit diagram of a typical oscillator circuit

 

A solution is to use a probe with high input resistance and low input capacitance in order to cause the lowest possible loading effect. In general, a passive probe with 100:1 attenuation ratio such as Keysight N2876A passive probe (with 2.6 pF of input capacitance) reduces capacitive loading significantly on the circuit, compared to a conventional 10:1 passive probe with ~10 pF of capacitive loading. Loading can be further reduced by switching the oscilloscope input coupling from DC to AC, as DC coupling mode on an oscilloscope presents additional loading to the oscillator and may cause it to stop.

 

Or, better yet, using an active probe with low input loading such as Keysight’s N2795A 1 GHz active probe or N2796A 2 GHz single-ended active probe may deliver better results. This active probe provides 1 Mohm input at DC and low frequencies for low resistance in parallel with <1 pF input capacitance loading to the circuits. Another good probe for oscillator circuit measurement is a Keysight InfiniiMax 1130A Series or N2750A Series InfiniiMode probe that presents even lower loading to the circuit.

Input impedance equivalent model of Keysight N2795A/96A single-ended active probe

Figure 3 Input impedance equivalent model of N2795A/96A single-ended active probe

 

Also, it’s important to note how to connect the probe to the DUT. If your probe connection has obviously longer input lead wires or a connector at the tip, you should suspect frequency response variation and degradation. In general, the longer the input wires or leads of a probe tip, the more it may decrease the bandwidth, increase the loading, cause non-flat frequency response and result in more variation in response. If at all possible, keep the input leads of the probe tip as small as possible, and keep the loop area of connection as small as possible.

Keep the input leads and loop area of connection small for more accurate results

Figure 4 Keep the input leads and the loop area of the connection as small as possible for more accurate results.

If your probe connection has longer input lead wires or a connector, look for frequency response variation and degradation

Figure 5 If your probe connection has obviously longer input lead wires or a connector at the tip, you should look for frequency response variation and degradation.

Today is the day! Today is the day!!

Why is today so important? I’m glad you asked.

Well, for starters, it’s the first day of Scope Month! If you liked last year’s Scope Month, you’re going to love the 2017 version. During the entire month of March, we’re giving away 125 oscilloscopes – that’s more than 3x what we gave away last year. Make sure you enter every day for even more chances to win. Bookmark www.scopemonth.com for easy access to all of the information you need. And, check out the drawings on YouTube each day to see if you’re one of the winners. Don’t want to leave it to chance? Check out the Test to Impress Contest and tell us why you should get a new oscilloscope.

But why else is today so important?

InfiniiVision 1000 X-Series

One of the main Scope Month giveaways is the new InfiniiVision 1000 X-Series, and we just introduced it today! The 1000 X-Series has 50 to 100 MHz bandwidths and a starting price of $449 (USD). This oscilloscope family lets you capture more of your signal and see more signal detail than similarly-priced scopes with its up to 2 GSa/s sampling rate and 50,000 waveforms per second update rate. They feature up to 6-in-1 instrument functionality to give you even more value for your money, and they have 2 analog channels (and the external trigger can be used as a 3rd digital channel). Segmented memory capability maximizes the memory depth while helping the scope test faster. Basically, if you want the best cheap oscilloscope available, you should be looking into the 1000 X-Series.

The 1000 X-Series is ideal for new (or intermediate) oscilloscope users. The front-panel is industry-standard, so you know it’s going to be similar to other oscilloscopes you’ve used (or will use in the future). And getting up to speed on oscilloscope functionality is easy with its built-in help features. So if you’re stuck or want more explanation about a measurement, you can press down and hold any button to access help screens and short setup tips.

 1000 X-Series Oscilloscope built-in1000 X-Series Oscilloscope training signals

   Built-in help comes in 13 different languages                                       11 training signals are built into the scopes

Educators also like the 1000 X-Series because in addition to giving students easy access to help information, an Educators Resource Kit is included at no additional cost. Other vendors usually charge more for their Educators Resource Kit, but Keysight’s 1000 X-Series oscilloscopes come standard with 11 build-in training signals, a comprehensive oscilloscope lab guide, and an oscilloscope fundamentals slide show for professors and lab assistants. Another big draw for educators is the Bode plot capability made possible with the frequency response analyzer in the EDUX1002G and DSOX1102G models.

The 1000 X-Series’ 6-in-1 instrument integration means you’re getting even more out of your oscilloscope investment. In addition to being an oscilloscope, it is also a:

  • Frequency response analyzer (EDUX1002G and DSOX1102G models only)
  • WaveGen function generator (EDUX1002G and DSOX1102G models only)
  • Serial protocol analyzer (with additional software)
  • Digital voltmeter (free with registration)
  • Frequency counter

 

To learn more about the 6-in-1 capability, check out pages 8 and 9 of the 1000 X-Series data sheet.

The 1000 X-Series has professional-quality measurement and software analysis capability. These oscilloscopes have 24 typical oscilloscope measurements to help you quickly analyze signals and determine signal parameters. The gated FFT function gives you additional signal analysis, letting you correlate time and frequency domain on a single screen. Mask limit testing is also available to help you easily detect signal errors. The 1000 X-Series supports analysis and decode of popular embedded and automotive serial bus applications, including I2C, UART/RS232, SPI, CAN and LIN.

1000 X-Series Oscilloscope measurment1000 X-Series Oscilloscope measurment

As you can see, while the 1000 X-Series oscilloscopes are low-cost, Keysight managed to pack a lot of capability into them. Years of Keysight-custom technology and expertise was leveraged to look for ways to aggressively reduce costs while not sacrificing on quality. (But more about that in a later blog post!)

Here are the raw specs, but make sure to check out the 1000 X-Series web page for more information or click here to get a 1000 X-Series quote.

 Models

EDUX1002A

EDUX1002G

DSOX1102A

DSOX1102G

Bandwidth

50 MHz

70/100 MHz

Price

$449 (USD)

$649 (USD)

$649 (USD)

$849 (USD)

Bandwidth upgrade

-

100 MHz opt (DSOX1B7T102)

Display

7 inch WVGA non-touch

Waveform update

50,000 wfms/sec

Vertical sensitivity

500 uV/div ~ 10 V/div

DVM

Free with the customer registration

Channels

2 channel

Probes

1:1, 10:1 switchable 70 MHz

(N2142A)

1:1, 10:1 switchable 200 MHz

(N2140A)

Sampling rate

1 GSa/s

2 GSa/s

Memory

100 kpts standard

1 Mpts standard

Segment memory

-

Standard

Mask/limit test

-

Standard

WaveGen (20 MHz)

-

Yes, standard

-

Yes, standard

Bode plot

-

Yes, standard

-

Yes, standard

Serial decodes

I²C, UART (opt. EDUX1EMBD)

I²C, SPI, UART (opt. DSOX1EMBD) CAN, LIN (opt. DSOX1AUTO)

Warranty

3 year standard (5 year option)

It’s Scope Month, and you know what that means, oscilloscope giveaways! But this year we’re giving you even more chances to win.

 

How?

This year Scope Month includes a scavenger hunt. We have hidden your favorite oscilloscope guru Daniel Bogdanoff all over the world (don’t worry, they’re just life-size cardboard cutouts). Your job? Find Daniel. If you (the scopes community) find Daniel, we will add more scopes to the daily drawings during Scope Month! And the faster that you find him, the more free oscilloscopes it means for you!

 

What do I do?

Watch the Keysight Oscilloscopes Facebook and YouTube channels, because we will release a clue on the whereabouts of Daniel each Monday during Scope Month. Once you have the clue, start searching. If you get stuck, come back to the comments section of this blog post where you can collaborate with the rest of the world and maybe together you can find Daniel sooner. When you find the Daniel cutout, post a picture of it along with the hashtag #GoFindDaniel to the Keysight Oscilloscopes Facebook page or mention @Keysight_Daniel on Twitter so that we know to add more oscilloscopes to the drawing.

 

How many oscilloscopes?

If you find the Daniel cutout by 11:59 pm US Mountain Time (6:59 am UTC time) on Tuesday, we will add FIVE MORE SCOPES to the prize pool for that week. If he is found before midnight on Wednesday, we will give away four more scopes, before midnight on Thursday means three more, midnight on Friday is two more, and if Daniel is found by 11:59 pm on Saturday evening, we will add one extra scope to the prize pool. So work together! The sooner you find the cutout, the more free oscilloscopes we will give away! And you don’t even have to wait long for your reward! The drawings for these additional oscilloscopes will be done on or before the following Monday!

 

Don’t forget to enter the oscilloscope giveaway every day during Scope Month for your chance to win a new Keysight 1000 X-Series oscilloscope.

 

Check out the rest of the Keysight oscilloscope family

 

Terms and Conditions

 

GoFindDaniel CLUE #2: 68747470733a2f2f7777772e796f75747562652e636f6d2f77617463683f763d3645703650425379366945

 

What is the best oscilloscope for your application? The following areas will help you make an accurate and informed decision. Today’s complex electronics industries require a broad spectrum of test equipment, with oscilloscopes being one of the most fundamental tools used by engineers and technicians. Oscilloscopes provide design and manufacturing engineers with critical insights to signal properties suggesting additional design work needed, targeting manufacturing issues, or performing compliance and protocol testing per international standards.

Oscilloscopes fall into two groups, real-time oscilloscopes and sampling oscilloscopes (also called equivalent-time oscilloscopes) and it is important to understand the difference between the two types. Real-time oscilloscopes digitize a signal in real-time. Imagine a repetitive AC signal - the real-time oscilloscope acts like a camera, taking a series of frames of the signal during each cycle. The amount of frames the real-time oscilloscope captures depends upon the bandwidth, memory depth, and other attributes that we will soon discuss. A sampling oscilloscope, on the other hand, takes only one shot of the signal per cycle. By repeating this one shot, but at slightly different time frames, the sampling oscilloscope can reconstruct the signal with a high degree of accuracy.

The following topics can help you better evaluate which kind of oscilloscope will best suit your needs.

Trigger

Sampling oscilloscopes are designed to capture, display, and analyze repetitive signals. If your oscilloscope solution needs to capture a single random event within your waveform, a real-time oscilloscope should be selected. Whether you are looking at intermittent signals during product design or manufacturing, real-time oscilloscopes allow you to trigger on a specific event such as a rising voltage threshold, a set up and hold violation, or a pattern trigger. The real-time oscilloscope will capture and store continuous sample points around these triggers and update the display with the captured data.

 

Bandwidth

The frequency of your signal under test and the harmonics within it will determine the bandwidth of the oscilloscope that will fit your needs. Sampling and real-time oscilloscopes cover a wide bandwidth range and there is a lot of overlap. A sampling oscilloscope can acquire any signal up to the analog bandwidth of the oscilloscope regardless of the sample rate. But a real-time oscilloscope must gather a significant number of samples after the initial trigger to accurately display a waveform. A typical rule of thumb for a real-time oscilloscope bandwidth is 2.5 times your signal frequency to reproduce your signal with the best fidelity. So you can get by with an effectively lower bandwidth scope using a sampling scope as long as you have the trigger mentioned in the previous section.

 

Memory Depth

Oscilloscope memory depth is an important specification for only real-time oscilloscopes. A real-time oscilloscope captures an entire waveform on each trigger event. To do this the real-time oscilloscope captures a large number of data points in one continuous record. For a real-time oscilloscope, the memory is directly tied to the sample rate. The more memory you have, the more samples (sample rate) you can capture for each waveform.  The higher the sample rate, the higher the effective bandwidth of the oscilloscope.  There is a simple calculation to determine the sample rate given a specified time base setting and a specific amount of memory (assuming 10 divisions across screen): Memory depth / ((time per division setting) * 10 divisions) = sample rate (up to the max sample rate of the ADCs). This memory depth concept does not apply to sampling oscilloscopes because only one instantaneous measurement of waveform amplitude is taken at the sampling instant.

 

Analog to Digital Converter Bits

Sampling oscilloscopes can have as high as a 14-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC). Consequently, they have a very large dynamic range, which enables viewing signals ranging from a few millivolts to a full volt without the need for attenuation. This allows sampling oscilloscopes to maintain very low noise levels at all volts per division settings. A real-time oscilloscope is limited in its dynamic range to 8 - 10 bits depending upon the model, but typically will show an effective bit number of around 6 – 8 bits respectively. Because of a real-time oscilloscope’s lower signal-to-noise ratio, it is designed with attenuators to correctly display signals at specific volts per division settings.

 

Frequency Response

Frequency response is another key consideration in your selection criteria. Sampling oscilloscopes do not use digital signal processing (DSP) correction, so the frequency response rolls off slowly and looks more Gaussian in shape. Real-time oscilloscopes can implement DSP to correct their frequency response. For instance, Keysight’s S-Series oscilloscope has a very flat frequency response across its bandwidth, which means its gain will not vary by more than 1 dB across the entire band.

 

Clock Recovery

The clock recovery component of an oscilloscope measurement is used for building real-time eyes, mask testing, and jitter separation. A recovered clock is a reference clock within the oscilloscope and used for measurement comparisons. Keysight’s Sampling oscilloscopes provide an accurate software-based clock recovery system. In many applications, real-time oscilloscopes have a software clock recovery and selectable hardware clock recovery frequencies. Please note that the advantage of a software clock recovery is that it is not prone to the hardware errors, and will land its edges where they need to be regardless of the data rate.

 

Applications

Sampling oscilloscopes, like real-time oscilloscopes, offer eye diagrams, histograms, and jitter measurements. With high bandwidths, modularity, and lower pricing, they typically fit manufacturing environments better than real-time oscilloscopes.

 

Many of Keysight’s sampling oscilloscopes have modular systems consisting of a mainframe and various electrical, optical and TDR modules. This allows the end user to customize measurement hardware to fit their solution. Sampling oscilloscope electrical and TDR channels can be integrated into a module to reduce cost or remote heads can be used to improve accuracy. Optical channels are always integrated creating a well-controlled 4th-order Bessel-Thomson frequency roll-off.

 

When making jitter measurements clock recovery systems play a large role. Understanding the clock recovery algorithm and the jitter transfer function used will help you determine your final oscilloscope selection. The sampling oscilloscope has a slightly lower jitter and a higher dynamic range making it ideal for characterization in a controlled environment assuming that your signal is repeatable. However, real-time oscilloscopes are great if you need to trigger on difficult to find events. Real-time oscilloscope users can choose from a long list of compliance, protocol triggering and decode, and analysis applications including jitter.

 

Form Factor

Your solution may require an oscilloscope solution with a specific size or configuration (form factor) to fit your needs. Keysight has both sampling and real-time scope solutions in a variety of form factors, from standard desk top and rack mountable frames to faceless (no screen) module solutions in a variety of AXI or PXI configurations. See the links below for sampling and real-time options.

 

http://fieldcom.cos.keysight.com/portal/Coll.php?cId=-32528

http://fieldcom.cos.keysight.com/portal/Coll.php?cId=-32546

 

Summary

On the surface there is a lot of overlap between sampling and real-time oscilloscopes but the differences in capabilities and performance that we have discussed can help you make an informed decision to tailor a selection to your specific application.

 

If you require measurements of a repetitive waveform with lower jitter and a higher dynamic range, a sampling oscilloscope is a good choice. In addition, sampling oscilloscopes have an advantage of a lower initial cost and modular upgrades, making them well suited for electrical and optical manufacturing test applications. Real-time oscilloscopes come in a variety of bandwidths, include the ability to capture single-shot events as well as repetitive signals.

 

Both Keysight sampling and real-time oscilloscopes are available in frequencies from 1 GHz to 50 GHz and beyond with a variety of modular and frame options to fit your specific requirements.

 keysight oscilloscopes samplingscope

If you didn’t get everything you wanted for Valentine’s Day, check out the latest Infiniium oscilloscope firmware (version 5.75) – it may have what you wished for. Its updates include a front panel macro recorder, the ability to load and save .mat files, multiple undo/redo capabilities, and more!

The front panel macro recorder allows you to record all of your actions with the keyboard, mouse, and touchscreen so that you only have to go through your set ups once – you can save and playback the macro record or load it to be executed as a set of SCPI commands. It retains up to 500 commands.

Macro Recorder

If you use MATLAB, you’ll enjoy the ease of saving waveform data as a .mat file and the ability to open a waveform .mat file as a memory waveform. Remember, Infiniium allows you to open and view up to 8 waveforms at once.

waveform files

Perhaps my favorite addition to the software is the new Undo and Redo capability. If you’ve ever accidentally clicked on a setting that you didn’t like or wish you could go back one step, two steps, five steps, etc. you can now do that with Undo/Redo. You can either step back through your changes one at a time or use the drop down menus to undo or redo multiple steps at once. Too bad we don’t have an Undo/Redo for any Valentine’s Day dates-gone-wrong (unless you’re spending the evening with your oscilloscope – then Keysight has your back)!

Scope controls

If you are testing PAM-4, check out the latest updates to our PAM-4 Compliance Application N8836A. Free trial here. We have added new Continuous Time Linear Equalizer for eye height, width, and symmetry mask width, new J4 jitter support, and PRBS13Q test pattern.

In addition we have added more bit error rates for jitter analysis (J2, J4, J5, and J9) and more hardware serial trigger data rates:

  • 2.4882 Gb/s
  • 3.7125 Gb/s
  • 4.455 Gb/s
  • 4.640 Gb/s
  • 5.5688 Gb/s
  • 5.94 Gb/s
  • 7.425 Gb/s
  • 9.95328 Gb/s
  • 12.440 Gb/s

If any of these look like the Valentine’s wish you were hoping for, update to latest software to your Infiniium oscilloscope & PC, or try the software for free.

Download Infiniium software version 5.75

KeysightOsciloscopes

Scope Month 2017

Posted by KeysightOsciloscopes Employee Feb 15, 2017

It’s almost that time again, we’re only a few weeks away from Scope Month 2017! If you missed out last year, or are just getting ready for this year, here’s what you need to know.

 

Just like you, we love oscilloscopes. So Keysight created an entire month to celebrate oscilloscopes and the great engineers who use them, that’s you! March 1, 2017 kicks off Scope Month, which will run through March 31, 2017, and will offer new measurement tips, oscilloscope resources, a new Keysight oscilloscope, and of course oscilloscope giveaways!

Everyone’s favorite part of Scope Month is the oscilloscope giveaways, and this year won’t disappoint. For Keysight Scope Month 125 oscilloscope giveawaysScope Month 2017, Keysight is giving away more than 125 oscilloscopes! We will be drawing new winners each weekday during Scope Month and posting these drawings on our YouTube Channel along with a helpful measurement tip for you. You will be able to enter the drawing once per day during Scope Month, and all entries will be eligible for the entire drawing period. And the best part is that you can get an extra chance to win: if you enter now, you get an early entry into the sweepstakes (only one per person during the early-entry period).

 

Enter now

 

Any questions? Check out the FAQs on this page. Did we miss anything? Ask your questions in the comment section below and we’ll get back to you.

 

 

Keysight Test to Impress contestNot quite ready to leave a new oscilloscope up to chance? You can also participate in the Test to Impress video contest. Just create and submit a video explaining why you need a new Keysight oscilloscope and how you would use it, and you could win one! Eligible entries will be reviewed by a panel of recognized industry voices who will choose 1 Grand Prize winner to win a 6-GHz 6000 X-Series oscilloscope and 2 “Runner up” winners to receive brand new Keysight 350-MHz 3000T X-Series oscilloscopes. Entries will be accepted March 1-31st, 2017 at www.scopemonth.com. Be sure to stay tuned after Scope Month, because we’ll announce the winners April 14th, 2017.

 

 

Keysight new oscilloscope

But wait, there’s more… this year the start of Scope Month also means a big SURPRISE. We can’t give it away just yet, but we can tell you there’s a brand new oscilloscope coming to the Keysight family and Scope Month will give you the first chance to see it and even get your hands on one for free (and you’ll definitely want to get your hands on one)!

 

Add the live Scope Month kickoff to your calendar to make sure you’re the first to see it!

 

 

While you wait for Scope Month to begin, we have quite a few great resources to help you with your measurement challenges:

  • Oscilloscope Learning CenterQuickly access video tutorials, application notes, white papers, and industry experts. Whether it’s your first time in front of a scope or you’ve been using one for decades, the oscilloscope learning center can help you stay ahead of next technology.
  • Oscilloscope blog – follow us to see a new post each week around topics from new releases to helpful tips to industry news
  • EEs Talk Tech – Join Mike and Daniel for an insider’s perspective on some of the latest technology trends and what they mean for you
  • Keysight 2 Minute Guru – Check out this series of 2-minute videos for tips on making better measurements
  • Digital Design and Test webcast series – Need a little more detail on some of the more complex measurements? Check out our free webcast series and join technology experts for more info on a range of topics

 

Check them out today!

The New Design and Test Challenges

If you plan on leveraging the work you previously did in your PCIe 3.0 design, you are mistaken. A doubling of the speed from 8 gigatransfers/second to 16 gigatransfers/second has a tremendous impact on both the design and validation of your high speed interconnect technology.

 

What are the Key Drivers for PCIe 4.0?

Big Data Needs Throughput. Big data is a term for data sets that are so large or complex that traditional data processing applications are inadequate to deal with them. Challenges include analysis, capture, data curation, search, sharing, storage, transfer, visualization, querying, and updating.

Networking Connectivity Applications.   Streaming movies, streaming sporting events, on-demand TV and the multitude of personal videos uploaded and downloaded is growing exponentially. Simply put, PCIe 3.0 cannot keep up with the latest Ethernet specs without increasing the number of lanes that are required. An increase in the number of lanes means increased cost in terms of power, circuit board layout and required components.  

Storage Technology. PCIe 3.0 has been pushed to its limits for SSD (Solid State) storage devices.   Greater interconnect speeds are required to take advantage of latest storage technologies.

 

Challenges

Channel Attenuation – Higher frequency means greater channel loss. PCIe 3.0 circuit traces can be made to run up to 16-20 inches if design care is taken. PCIe 4.0, on the other hand, is expected to have a maximum trace length of 10-12 inches. It’s simply impossible to use low-cost FR-4, pass through two connectors, and retain enough signal integrity at these speeds; no matter how robust the transmit and receive equalization schemes at the source and endpoint devices are.

So how do you mitigate the effects of greater channel attenuation?    

The answer is retimer(s). A retimer is actually an extension component or, thought of another way, a smart repeater operating at the physical layer to fine tune the signal. So to achieve 20 inches you can place the retimer at 10 inches from both the transmitter and receiver to ensure the required channel length. The link initialization protocol still negotiates the amount of transmitter de-emphasis (to optimize the receiver equalization), but now this negotiation is done to and from the retimer instead of the transmitter.   Therefore, the Retimer, from a link equalization standpoint, behaves exactly like any endpoint or root complex device. It has an upstream and downstream side so when you boot up it starts the initialization. This essentially doubles the essentially doubling the channel length, but at an added cost.  

Signal Integrity – If you are driving a signal into the channel transmit lane (Tx) and it encounters a change in the impedance profile, it will generate a reflection and, if the return loss of the SERDES is sufficiently high, (meaning poor) it bounces back down the channel. If I have high return loss, then the reflected signal may significantly impact the integrity of the transmitted signal.

So whatever design you use for PCIe 3.0 will not work for 4.0. It is not simply a matter of doubling the data rate, because you now have to meet a more stringent return loss characteristic.   So, you actually have to change the design at the silicon level to effectively give you more return loss at the higher frequencies.

Receiver Calibration – The key challenge is the ever shrinking eye height specification. PCIe 4.0 specifies a minimum eye height of 15 mV after equalization with a maximum bit error rate 1 X 10-12.   You are totally dependent upon your receiver’s ability to maximize the eye height. You now have to calibrate to an even finer grain of detail.

 

How do you effectively validate and test?

Keysight is the first to market with full support of both PCIe 4.0 TX Tests under the 0.7 version of the specification and includes the extensive reference clock phase jitter tests required under this specification.

The N5393F compliance test software for transmitter testing of PCI Express 4.0 devices allows for BASE spec testing of new PCI Express silicon under the 0.7 version of the PCIe 4.0 specification. The N5393F product supports transmitter testing of speeds up to 16 GBits/s while also supporting intermediate speeds of 2.5G, 5G, and 8GBit/s. In addition, legacy PCI Express 1.1, 2.X, and 3.X transmitter tests are also supported. This software will run on real time oscilloscopes having 12 GHz (or greater bandwidth) including the Z-Series, V-Series, X-Series, Q-Series, and 90000A platforms.

The N5393F also includes reference clock tests defined in the PCIe 4.0 specification, covering phase jitter requirements. Since the vast majority of PCI Express implementations utilize a common reference clock architecture, it is critical to ensure that a candidate reference clock device meets the many different permutations of phase jitter required for each of the 4 data rates. For PCIe 4.0, this represents over 144 different tests that have to be performed on the reference clock.

The N5393F also adds support for transmitter testing over the new U.2 (or SFF-8639) connector. As PCI Express expands its application base to support Solid State Storage Drives (or SSDs), the U.2 connector has been chosen as the main interface used in computer server platforms.

 Keysight PCIe Compliance Application

Easily select any PCIe transmit compliance application.

PCIe Compliance Application Menu

All testing is automated and produces a hyperlinked HTML report file that makes it easy to identify and study any failed or marginal clock jitter parameters.

Learn more about all of Keysight's PCI Express (PCIe) design and test solutions