• ECE Student Success Toolkit – Thinking at the Speed of Light

    The previous blog post focused on generalized number bases – an essential concept of electrical and computer engineering (ECE) that is often not covered well at the high school level. Another area where pre-coll...
    BradJolly
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  • ECE Student Success Toolkit - Generalized Number Bases

    A motivated high school student can usually obtain appropriate high school math preparation for an electrical and computer engineering (ECE) or computer science course of study. Algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and ca...
    BradJolly
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  • ECE Student Success Toolkit - Electronics Glossaries

    It is difficult for electrical and computer engineering (ECE) students to master the field’s many technical terms, abbreviations, and acronyms. While topics like resistance, capacitance, voltage, current, and po...
    BradJolly
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  • ECE Student Success Toolkit - Online Circuit Simulator

    One challenging aspect of electrical and computer engineering (ECE) is that electrical current is inherently difficult to visualize. Mechanical engineers see things spin and bend; chemical engineers see color changes ...
    BradJolly
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  • ECE Student Success Toolkit - Free Image Processing Textbook

    A previous blog post in this series highlighted the free circuits textbook from the Free Electrical Engineering Textbook Initiative. The initiative is a joint effort among experienced, highly respected professors from...
    BradJolly
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  • ECE Student Success Toolkit - Free CCDF Charts, Part 2

    This is a follow-up to the previous post on how you can create CCDF charts quickly, and for free. That post ended with a nice-looking CCDF chart, shown below. Figure 1: CCDF Chart   While this chart is correc...
    BradJolly
    created by BradJolly
  • ECE Student Success Toolkit - Free CCDF Charts

    There is an obvious, longstanding trend in electrical and computer engineering (ECE) toward energy conservation and ever-longer battery life. This is especially true in applications related to the Internet of Things (...
    BradJolly
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  • ECE Student Success Toolkit - Free Math Analysis Textbook

    If you will pardon the pun, an electrical and computer engineering (ECE) student must be solidly grounded in mathematical analysis to succeed in calculus, differential equations, Laplace transforms, and other areas of...
    BradJolly
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  • ECE Student Success Toolkit - Cool Oscilloscope Benefits

    An electrical and computer engineering (ECE) student studying waveforms, noise, and signal modulation must generate and view a signal. Lab equipment is sometimes in short supply, and if no function generator is availa...
    BradJolly
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  • ECE Student Success Toolkit – The Parametric Measurement Handbook

    The field of electrical and computer engineering (ECE) is very broad; some well-known universities require 134 credits or more for a bachelor’s degree. Even with that many credits, there is no way an undergradua...
    BradJolly
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  • ECE Student Success Toolkit – Free circuits textbook

    A college student recently told me that food at her school’s cafeteria costs about $132 per week, which is a considerable amount of money. The textbook for the introductory circuits class at the same school list...
    BradJolly
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  • ECE Student Success Toolkit

    Opportunities for electrical and computer engineering (ECE) graduates seem to be virtually unlimited, with growth in health and medical devices, Internet of Things, consumer electronics, supercomputing, artificial int...
    BradJolly
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  • Making Learning Stick, Part 2

    The most recent blog post discussed  the book Make it Stick, the Science of Successful Learning, by Henry L. Roediger III, Mark A. McDaniel, and Peter C. Brown. The authors’ intent is to replace the theory,...
    BradJolly
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  • Making Learning Stick

    A frustrated elementary school teacher recently told me of her exasperation with teaching math. Just a week before the school’s mandated standardized tests, she had repeatedly drilled her students on adding and ...
    BradJolly
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  • Easy divisibility rules that hardly anybody knows (Part 3)

    The first and second blog posts in this series described divisibility rules for 11, 7, and 21. To summarize:   Divisor Rule Example 11 Chop, subtract 3476 347 – 6 = 341 34 – 1 = 33 7 or...
    BradJolly
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  • Easy divisibility rules that hardly anybody knows (Part 2)

    The previous blog post described the “chop, subtract” rule for determining divisibility by 11. You chop the number’s ones digit and subtract it from what remains. If that difference is a multiple of ...
    BradJolly
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  • Easy divisibility rules that hardly anybody knows (Part 1)

    Most curriculum standards include divisibility rules for 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 10. A few also mention rules for divisibility by 8 or 12. Divisibility rules for numbers like 7, 11, 13, 17, 21, and so on are usually omi...
    BradJolly
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  • Stepping up to ensure successful futures

    It was encouraging to see so much attention on K-12 STEM activities at the recent ECEDHA Conference and ECExpo (#ECEDHA2018). As Keysight’s chief technical officer Jay Alexander observed, students are engaged by...
    BradJolly
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  • A Novel Approach to Coding Theory

    Most of the conversation at the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Heads Association (ECEDHA) 2018 Conference and ECExpo focused on hardware, software, firmware, giga-this, femto-that, and all the cool app...
    BradJolly
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  • ECEDHA Leadership in Robotics

    The National Robotics Education Foundation predicts 500,000 robotics jobs will be created from 2016 through 2020. This is promising news for ECE students, instructors, and researchers, and the Electrical and Computer ...
    BradJolly
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