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BradJolly
The most recent blog post discussed  the book Make it Stick, the Science of Successful Learning, by Henry L. Roediger III, Mark A. McDaniel, and Peter C. Brown. The authors’ intent is to replace the theory, lore, and intuition that underlies much current learning theory with scientifically tested facts.   The problem with current learning theory… (Show more)
in Keysight STEM Outreach
BradJolly
A frustrated elementary school teacher recently told me of her exasperation with teaching math. Just a week before the school’s mandated standardized tests, she had repeatedly drilled her students on adding and subtracting fractions, and nearly every student scored well on her chapter test. Yet when the students took the standardized test, the… (Show more)
in Keysight STEM Outreach
BradJolly
The first and second blog posts in this series described divisibility rules for 11, 7, and 21. To summarize:   Divisor Rule Example 11 Chop, subtract 3476 347 – 6 = 341 34 – 1 = 33 7 or 21 Chop, double, subtract 2954 295 – 8 = 287 28 – 14 = 14   These rules work because adding or subtracting multiples of n does not change… (Show more)
in Keysight STEM Outreach
BradJolly
The previous blog post described the “chop, subtract” rule for determining divisibility by 11. You chop the number’s ones digit and subtract it from what remains. If that difference is a multiple of 11 (0, 11, 22, 33, …), so is the original number. If that difference is not a multiple of 11, neither is the original number.   For example, 1083 is… (Show more)
in Keysight STEM Outreach
BradJolly
Most curriculum standards include divisibility rules for 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 10. A few also mention rules for divisibility by 8 or 12. Divisibility rules for numbers like 7, 11, 13, 17, 21, and so on are usually omitted, but they should be included for four reasons: The rules are useful. They are easy to use. It is easy to understand why they… (Show more)
in Keysight STEM Outreach
BradJolly
It was encouraging to see so much attention on K-12 STEM activities at the recent ECEDHA Conference and ECExpo (#ECEDHA2018). As Keysight’s chief technical officer Jay Alexander observed, students are engaged by things that move, and there was much activity around maker spaces (Arizona State, Bucknell, Illinois, New Haven, Pennsylvania) and… (Show more)
in Keysight STEM Outreach
BradJolly
Most of the conversation at the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Heads Association (ECEDHA) 2018 Conference and ECExpo focused on hardware, software, firmware, giga-this, femto-that, and all the cool applications that these things enable. That was to be expected.   What was unexpected was the introduction of a children’s book… (Show more)
in Keysight STEM Outreach
BradJolly
The National Robotics Education Foundation predicts 500,000 robotics jobs will be created from 2016 through 2020. This is promising news for ECE students, instructors, and researchers, and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Heads Association (@ECEDHA) is very active in this transformational area.   A recent article in ECE Source… (Show more)
in Keysight STEM Outreach
BradJolly
  The Pythagorean Theorem is both very useful and widely known. However, it is simply a special case of a much broader theorem, that very few people know.   Consider this isosceles triangle. If a perpendicular bisector from the apex has length a, then we have the familiar Pythagorean Theorem:   a2 + b2 = c2 But what if the line from the apex is… (Show more)
in Keysight STEM Outreach
BradJolly
The Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Heads Association (ECEDHA) will be hosting the 2018 ECEDHA Annual Conference and ECExpo in Monterey, CA from March 16 – 20, and this year’s event looks to be exciting and interesting.   The theme of #ECEDHA2018 is Reenvisioning ECE, and the lineup of speakers and workshops looks to be appropriate… (Show more)
in Keysight STEM Outreach
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